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The Food Price Spikes of 2008/09 and 2010/11: Impacts and Policies in African Countries

  • Pedro Conceição

    (UNDP, Regional Bureau for Africa)

  • Sebastian Levine

    (UNDP, Regional Bureau for Africa)

  • Zuzana Brixiova

    (UNDP, Swaziland)

This paper explores the varied impacts during the two spikes in food prices in 2007/08 and 2010/11 and the differences in the policy responses among African countries. It first links changes in international food prices, the impact on domestic prices, and the range of responses available to national policy makers. Policy responses by African governments to food price increases are then surveyed and characterized according to their macro, micro or structural focus, and the countryspecific circumstances. The paper also discusses the impact of rising food prices on household welfare and underscores the importance of timely and effective mitigating policies.

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File URL: http://web.undp.org/africa/knowledge/WP-2011-003-conceicao-levine-brixova-food%20prices.pdf
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Paper provided by United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa (UNDP/RBA) in its series Working Papers with number 2011-003.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rac:wpaper:2011-003
Contact details of provider: Postal: One United Nations Plaza, New York, New York 10017
Web page: http://web.undp.org/africa/

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  1. Timmer, C. Peter, 2010. "Reflections on food crises past," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-11, February.
  2. Seck, Papa A. & Tollens, Eric & Wopereis, Marco C.S. & Diagne, Aliou & Bamba, Ibrahim, 2010. "Rising trends and variability of rice prices: Threats and opportunities for sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 403-411, October.
  3. Benson, Todd & Minot, Nicholas & Pender, John & Robles, Miguel & von Braun, Joachim, 2008. "Global food crises: Monitoring and assessing impact to inform policy responses," Food policy reports 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Alberto Zezza & Benjamin Davis & Carlo Azzarri & Katia Covarrubias & Luca Tasciotti & Gustavo Anriquez, 2008. "The Impact of Rising Food Prices on the Poor," Working Papers 08-07, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  5. Rabah Arezki & Markus Bruckner, 2011. "Food Prices and Political Instability," IMF Working Papers 11/62, International Monetary Fund.
  6. John Baffes & Bruce Gardner, 2003. "The transmission of world commodity prices to domestic markets under policy reforms in developing countries," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 159-180.
  7. Wodon, Quentin & Zaman, Hassan, 2008. "Rising food prices in Sub-Saharan Africa : poverty impact and policy responses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4738, The World Bank.
  8. Minot, Nicholas, 2011. "Transmission of world food price changes to markets in Sub-Saharan Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1059, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Wodon, Quentin & Tsimpo, Clarence & Backiny-Yetna, Prospere & Joseph, George & Adoho, Franck & Coulombe, Harold, 2008. "Potential impact of higher food prices on poverty : summary estimates for a dozen west and central African countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4745, The World Bank.
  10. C. Peter Timmer, 2009. "Did Speculation Affect World Rice Prices?," Working Papers 09-07, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  11. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
  12. Darryl Jones & Andrzej Kwiecinski, 2010. "Policy Responses in Emerging Economies to International Agricultural Commodity Price Surges," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 34, OECD Publishing.
  13. Deaton, Angus, 1989. "Rice Prices and Income Distribution in Thailand: A Non-parametric Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(395), pages 1-37, Supplemen.
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