IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/elg/eebook/14879.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Handbook on Food

Editor

Listed:
  • Raghbendra Jha
  • Raghav Gaiha
  • Anil B. Deolalikar

Abstract

The global population is forecasted to reach 9.4 billion by 2050, with much of this increase concentrated in developing regions and cities. Ensuring adequate food and nourishment to this large population is a pressing economic, moral and even security challenge and requires research (and action) from a multi-disciplinary perspective. This book provides the first such integrated approach to tackling this problem by addressing the multiplicity of challenges posed by rising global population, diet diversification and urbanization in developing countries and climate change.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Raghbendra Jha & Raghav Gaiha & Anil B. Deolalikar (ed.), 2014. "Handbook on Food," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14879, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:14879
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781004289.xml
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pingali, Prabhu, 2007. "Westernization of Asian diets and the transformation of food systems: Implications for research and policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 281-298, June.
    2. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert Vishny, 1989. "Income Distribution, Market Size, and Industrialization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(3), pages 537-564.
    3. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2008. "Occupational Choice and the Spirit of Capitalism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 747-793.
    4. Raghav Gaiha & Nidhi Kaicker & Katsushi Imai & Vani S. Kulkarni & Ganesh Thapa, 2012. "Has Dietary Transition Slowed Down in India: An analysis based on 50th, 61st and 66th Rounds of NSS," ASARC Working Papers 2012-07, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    5. Acemoglu, Daron & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1997. "Was Prometheus Unbound by Chance? Risk, Diversification, and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(4), pages 709-751, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Barrett, Christopher B. & Headey, Derek D., 2014. "Measuring resilience in a volatile world: A proposal for a multicountry system of sentinel sites :," 2020 conference papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Jing You & Sangui Wang & Laurence Roope, 2018. "Intertemporal deprivation in rural china: income and nutrition," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 16(1), pages 61-101, March.
    3. Ecker, Olivier & Hatzenbuehler, Patrick L. & Mahrt, Kristi, 2018. "Transforming agriculture for improving food and nutrition security among Nigerian farm households," NSSP working papers 56, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Keijiro Otsuka & Yanyan Liu & Futoshi Yamauchi, 2016. "The future of small farms in Asia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(3), pages 441-461, May.
    5. Jing You & Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha, 2014. "Decoding the Growth-Nutrition Nexus in China: Inequality, Uncertainty and Food Insecurity," Discussion Paper Series DP2014-28, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Dec 2014.
    6. Renuka Mahadevan & Vincent Hoang, 2016. "Is There a Link Between Poverty and Food Security?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 179-199, August.
    7. You, Jing & Kontoleon, Andreas & Wang, Sangui, 2015. "Identifying a Sustainable Pathway to Household Multi-dimensional Poverty Reduction in Rural China," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211865, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Jing You & Sangui Wang & Laurence Roope, 2014. "Multi-dimensional Intertemporal Poverty in Rural China," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-36, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    9. Mwangi, Dena M. & Fiedler, John L. & Sununtnasuk, Celeste, 2017. "Imputing nutrient intake from foods prepared and consumed away from home and other composite foods: Exploring extensions of the Subramanian–Deaton cost per calorie approach," IFPRI discussion papers 1596, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Paramita Bhattacharya & Siddhartha Mitra & Md. Zakaria Siddiqui, 2016. "Dynamics of Foodgrain Deficiency in India," Margin: The Journal of Applied Economic Research, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 10(4), pages 465-498, November.
    11. You, Jing & Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2016. "Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 171-191.
    12. Matthias Kalkuhl & Mekbib Haile & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka, 2015. "Cost-benefit framework for policy action to navigate food price spikes. FOODSECURE Working Paper No 33," FOODSECURE Working papers 33, LEI Wageningen UR.
    13. Hugh Wenban-Smith & Anja Faße & Ulrike Grote, 2016. "Food security in Tanzania: the challenge of rapid urbanisation," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(5), pages 973-984, October.
    14. Georg Lehecka, 2015. "Do hedging and speculative pressures drive commodity prices, or the other way round?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 575-603, September.
    15. Fiedler, John L. & Mwangi, Dena M., 2016. "Using household consumption and expenditure surveys to make inferences about food consumption, nutrient intakes and nutrition status: How important is it to adjust for meal partakers?," IFPRI discussion papers 1571, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Vani S. Kulkarni, 2014. "Global middle class and dietary patterns: a sociological perspective," Chapters, in: Raghbendra Jha & Raghav Gaiha & Anil B. Deolalikar (ed.), Handbook on Food, chapter 20, pages 515-538, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Khalid Abu-Ismail & Niranjan Sarang, 2015. "Rethinking the measurement of the middle class: Evidence from Egypt," WIDER Working Paper Series 023, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Khalid Abu-Ismail & Niranjan Sarang, 2015. "Rethinking the Measurement of the Middle Class: Evidence from Egypt," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-023, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Richard E. Baldwin & Philippe Martin & Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, 2021. "Global Income Divergence, Trade, and Industrialization: The Geography of Growth Take-Offs," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Firms and Workers in a Globalized World Larger Markets, Tougher Competition, chapter 2, pages 25-57, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Simplice A. Asongu & Julio Mukendi Kayembe, 2016. "Middle Class in Africa: Determinants and Consequences," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(4), pages 527-549, October.
    6. Kerekes, Monika, 2007. "Analyzing patterns of economic growth: a production frontier approach," Discussion Papers 2007/15, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    7. Jean Paul Azam & Robert Bates & Bruno Biais, 2009. "Political Predation And Economic Development," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 255-277, July.
    8. Carly Nichols, 2017. "Millets, milk and maggi: contested processes of the nutrition transition in rural India," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 34(4), pages 871-885, December.
    9. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Why England? Demographic factors, structural change and physical capital accumulation during the Industrial Revolution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 319-361, December.
    10. Lopez-Calva Luis F. & Rigolini Jamele & Torche Florencia, 2016. "Is there such thing as middle class values? Class differences, values and political orientations in Latin America," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-12, December.
    11. Handley, Antoinette, 2014. "Varieties of capitalists? The middle class, private sector and economic outcomes in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 101, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Antoinette Handley, 2014. "Varieties of Capitalists?: The Middle Class, Private Sector and Economic Outcomes in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-101, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Dominic Rohner & Mathias Thoenig & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2013. "War Signals: A Theory of Trade, Trust, and Conflict," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(3), pages 1114-1147.
    14. Eric Rougier & Jean‐Philippe Berrou & Matthieu Clément & François Combarnous & Dominique Darbon, 2021. "Should we call it a (middle) class? A socio‐economic exploration of the Vietnamese middle‐income group," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(8), pages 1321-1345, November.
    15. Paula Bustos & Gabriel Garber & Jacopo Ponticelli, 2016. "Capital Accumulation and Structural Transformation," Working Papers Series 444, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    16. Javalgi, Rajshekhar (Raj) G. & Grossman, David A., 2016. "Aspirations and entrepreneurial motivations of middle-class consumers in emerging markets: The case of India," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 657-667.
    17. Nizar, Muhammad Afdi, 2015. "Kelas Menengah (Middle Class) dan Implikasinya bagi Perekonomian Indonesia [Middle Class and Its Implications for the Indonesian Economy]," MPRA Paper 98471, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Loayza, Norman & Rigolini, Jamele & Llorente, Gonzalo, 2012. "Do middle classes bring about institutional reforms?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 440-444.
    19. Guercini, Simone & Runfola, Andrea, 2016. "How western marketers respond to the new middle class in emerging market cities: The case of Italian fashion marketers," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 691-702.
    20. Andy Sumner, 2012. "The Buoyant Billions: How “Middle Class” Are the New Middle Classes in Developing Countries? (And Why Does It Matter?)," Working Papers 309, Center for Global Development.

    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Development Studies; Economics and Finance; Environment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:14879. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Darrel McCalla (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.