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Financialisation of food commodity markets, price surge and volatility: new evidence

In: Handbook on Food

Author

Listed:
  • Kritika Mathur
  • Nidhi Kaicker
  • Raghav Gaiha
  • Katsushi S. Imai
  • Ganesh Thapa

Abstract

The global population is forecasted to reach 9.4 billion by 2050, with much of this increase concentrated in developing regions and cities. Ensuring adequate food and nourishment to this large population is a pressing economic, moral and even security challenge and requires research (and action) from a multi-disciplinary perspective. This book provides the first such integrated approach to tackling this problem by addressing the multiplicity of challenges posed by rising global population, diet diversification and urbanization in developing countries and climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Kritika Mathur & Nidhi Kaicker & Raghav Gaiha & Katsushi S. Imai & Ganesh Thapa, 2014. "Financialisation of food commodity markets, price surge and volatility: new evidence," Chapters, in: Raghbendra Jha & Raghav Gaiha & Anil B. Deolalikar (ed.), Handbook on Food, chapter 7, pages 149-176, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14879_7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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