IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iis/dispap/iiisdp396.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Food Demand System Estimation for Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Ole Boysen

    () (Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin)

Abstract

This article estimates a household demand system for Uganda from cross-sectional household survey data. More specifically, a 13 item two-stage demand system model is estimated for rural and urban households separately where the main second-stage is represented by a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System which accounts for socio-demographic household characteristics and censoring and focuses on food items. Elasticities are calculated for three household expenditure groups as well as for the aggregate. We find that food expenditures tend to be more elastic for poorer households than for richer ones. All foods are generally price inelastic and price elasticities tend to decrease with rising expenditure level. A number of substitutional and complementary relationships between food items are identified.

Suggested Citation

  • Ole Boysen, 2012. "A Food Demand System Estimation for Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp396, IIIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp396
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/iiis/documents/discussion/pdfs/iiisdp396.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. André Decoster & Frederic Vermeulen, "undated". "Evaluation of the Empirical Performance of Two-Stage Budgeting AIDS, QUAIDS and Rotterdam Models Based on Weak Separability," Working Papers Department of Economics ces9807, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    2. J. Scott Shonkwiler & Steven T. Yen, 1999. "Two-Step Estimation of a Censored System of Equations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 972-982.
    3. Cuma Akbay & Ismet Boz & Wen. S. Chern, 2008. "Household food consumption in Turkey: a reply," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 35(1), pages 99-102, March.
    4. Pollak, Robert A & Wales, Terence J, 1981. "Demographic Variables in Demand Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1533-1551, November.
    5. Alain Carpentier & Hervé Guyomard, 2001. "Unconditional Elasticities in Two-Stage Demand Systems: An Approximate Solution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 222-229.
    6. Teklu, T., 1996. "Food demand studies in Sub-Saharan Africa: a survey of empirical evidence," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 479-496, December.
    7. Angus Deaton & Salman Zaidi, 2002. "Guidelines for Constructing Consumption Aggregates for Welfare Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14101.
    8. Browning, Martin, 1992. "Children and Household Economic Behavior," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1434-1475, September.
    9. Diansheng Dong & Brian W. Gould & Harry M. Kaiser, 2004. "Food Demand in Mexico: An Application of the Amemiya-Tobin Approach to the Estimation of a Censored Food System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(4), pages 1094-1107.
    10. Panagiotis Lazaridis, 2004. "Demand elasticities derived from consistent estimation of Heckman-type models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(8), pages 523-527.
    11. J. A. L. Cranfield & James S. Eales & Thomas W. Hertel & Paul V. Preckel, 2003. "Model selection when estimating and predicting consumer demands using international, cross section data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 353-364, April.
    12. Simler, Kenneth R., 2010. "The short-term impact of higher food prices on poverty in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5210, The World Bank.
    13. Bart Capéau & Stefan Dercon, 2006. "Prices, Unit Values and Local Measurement Units in Rural Surveys: an Econometric Approach with an Application to Poverty Measurement in Ethiopia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 181-211, June.
    14. Steven Yen & Kamhon Kan & Shew-Jiuan Su, 2002. "Household demand for fats and oils: two-step estimation of a censored demand system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(14), pages 1799-1806.
    15. Murphy, Kevin M & Topel, Robert H, 2002. "Estimation and Inference in Two-Step Econometric Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 88-97, January.
    16. Blundell, Richard & Robin, Jean Marc, 1999. "Estimation in Large and Disaggregated Demand Systems: An Estimator for Conditionally Linear Systems," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 209-232, May-June.
    17. Jonathan M. Nzuma & Rakhal Sarker, 2010. "An error corrected almost ideal demand system for major cereals in Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 43-50, January.
    18. Heien, Dale & Wessells, Cathy Roheim, 1990. "Demand Systems Estimation with Microdata: A Censored Regression Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(3), pages 365-371, July.
    19. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Arthur Lewbel, 1997. "Quadratic Engel Curves And Consumer Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 527-539, November.
    20. Abdulai, Awudu & Aubert, Dominique, 2004. "A cross-section analysis of household demand for food and nutrients in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 67-79, July.
    21. Henningsen, Arne & Hamann, Jeff D., 2007. "systemfit: A Package for Estimating Systems of Simultaneous Equations in R," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 23(i04).
    22. Brian P. Poi, 2008. "Demand-system estimation: Update," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(4), pages 554-556, December.
    23. Atanu Saha & Oral Capps & Patrick Byrne, 1997. "Calculating marginal effects in dichotomous - continuous models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 181-185.
    24. David L. Edgerton, 1997. "Weak Separability and the Estimation of Elasticities in Multistage Demand Systems," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 62-79.
    25. Todd Benson & Samuel Mugarura & Kelly Wanda, 2008. "Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 513-524, November.
    26. Harald Tauchmann, 2005. "Efficiency of two-step estimators for censored systems of equations: Shonkwiler and Yen reconsidered," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 367-374.
    27. Donovan, Cynthia & McGlinchy, Megan & Staatz, John M. & Tschirley, David L., 2006. "Emergency Needs Assessments and the Impact of Food Aid on Local Markets," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54566, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    28. Ecker, Olivier & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Analyzing Nutritional Impacts of Policies: An Empirical Study for Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 412-428, March.
    29. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ole Boysen & Alan Matthews, 2017. "Will Economic Partnership Agreements Increase Poverty? The Case of Uganda," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 353-382, May.
    2. Larochelle, Catherine & Katungi, Enid & Cheng, Zhen, 2016. "Household consumption and demand for bean in Uganda: Determinants and implications for nutrition security," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246457, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    3. repec:eee:inteco:v:151:y:2017:i:c:p:85-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:1:p:98-122 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ole Boysen & Hans Grinsted Jensen & Alan Matthews, 2016. "Impact of EU agricultural policy on developing countries: A Uganda case study," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 377-402, June.
    6. Boysen, Ole & Matthews, Alan, 2012. "The differentiated effects of food price spikes on poverty in Uganda," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122445, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Ole Boysen, 2013. "High food prices and their implications for poverty in Uganda - From demand system estimation to simulation," EcoMod2013 5438, EcoMod.
    8. Xiaohua Yu & Satoru Shimokawa, 2016. "Nutritional impacts of rising food prices in African countries: a review," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(5), pages 985-997, October.
    9. Nicholas Kilimani, 2014. "Water Taxation and the Double Dividend Hypothesis," Working Papers 201451, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Uganda; quadratic almost ideal demand system; elasticities;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp396. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Colette Keleher). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cetcdie.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.