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Demand elasticities derived from consistent estimation of Heckman-type models


  • Panagiotis Lazaridis


As proved lately, the use of the Inverse Mill's Ratio as a correction factor in the second step of Heckman-type models leads to inconsistent estimates. One area where this type of model has been extensively used is the applied food demand analysis. As a consequence the derived demand elasticities are no longer valid. In this paper the appropriate expressions for demand elasticities are derived and are applied to 23 food items using family budget survey data.

Suggested Citation

  • Panagiotis Lazaridis, 2004. "Demand elasticities derived from consistent estimation of Heckman-type models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(8), pages 523-527.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:8:p:523-527 DOI: 10.1080/1350485042000207234

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. J. Scott Shonkwiler & Steven T. Yen, 1999. "Two-Step Estimation of a Censored System of Equations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 972-982.
    2. Andersson, Mari & Senauer, Benjamin, 1994. "Non-Purchasing Households In Food Expenditure Surveys: An Analysis For Potatoes In Sweden," Staff Papers 13232, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
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    5. Heien, Dale & Wessells, Cathy Roheim, 1990. "Demand Systems Estimation with Microdata: A Censored Regression Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(3), pages 365-371, July.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
    8. Atanu Saha & Oral Capps & Patrick Byrne, 1997. "Calculating marginal effects in dichotomous - continuous models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 181-185.
    9. John L. Park & Rodney B. Holcomb & Kellie Curry Raper & Oral Capps, 1996. "A Demand Systems Analysis of Food Commodities by U.S. Households Segmented by Income," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 290-300.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vassilopoulos, Achilleas & Klonaris, Stathis & Drichoutis, Andreas C. & Lazaridis, Panagiotis, 2012. "Modeling quality demand with data from Household Budget Surveys: An application to meat and fish products in Greece," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 2744-2750.
    2. Ole Boysen, 2016. "Food Demand Characteristics in Uganda: Estimation and Policy Relevance," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(2), pages 260-293, June.
    3. Mikkel Barslund, 2011. "Censored Demand System Estimation with Endogenous Expenditures in clustered samples: an application to food demand in urban Mozambique," LICOS Discussion Papers 28011, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    4. Zhuo Chen & Steven Yen, 2005. "On bias correction in the multivariate sample-selection model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(21), pages 2459-2468.

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