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Prices, poaching, and protein alternatives: An analysis of bushmeat consumption around Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

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  • Rentsch, Dennis
  • Damon, Amy

Abstract

The consumption of meat from wild animals (or bushmeat) occurs throughout Africa and highlights the conflict between two distinct development goals: food security and biodiversity conservation. Growing human populations throughout the greater Serengeti ecosystem rely heavily on bushmeat as a source of protein, which places pressure on migratory wildlife populations. This paper uses unique data from protein consumption surveys from 131 households over 34months in a generalizable empirical framework to estimate price, cross-price, and expenditure elasticities of protein sources, and analyze the potential economic effects of policies to mitigate bushmeat hunting and consumption. Results suggest that: (1) directly increasing the price of bushmeat through enforcement or other policies to reduce supply will have the most direct and largest effect of bushmeat consumption; (2) increasing income increases bushmeat consumption as well as consumption of other meat sources; (3) if surrounding fisheries experience a negative shock, or collapse, this will lead to a dramatic increase in bushmeat consumption. Overall, these results strongly indicate that policies to reduce bushmeat hunting while maintaining food security must be considered in a broad and comprehensive framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Rentsch, Dennis & Damon, Amy, 2013. "Prices, poaching, and protein alternatives: An analysis of bushmeat consumption around Serengeti National Park, Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-9.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:91:y:2013:i:c:p:1-9 DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2013.03.021
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    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Anke & Hanley, Nicholas & Lowassa, Asanterabi & Milner-Gulland, Eleanor J & Moro, Mirko & Naiman, Loiruck C, 2014. "An investigation of the determinants of household demand for bushmeat in the Serengeti using an open-ended choice experiment," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2014-07, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    2. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:39:y:2017:i:2:p:185-205 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Richard Damania & Pasquale Lucio Scandizzo & Ann Jeannette Glauber, 2014. "Ecosystems - Burden or Bounty?," CEIS Research Paper 324, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 Aug 2014.

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