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An investigation of the determinants of household demand for bushmeat in the Serengeti using an open-ended choice experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Fischer, Anke
  • Hanley, Nicholas
  • Lowassa, Asanterabi
  • Milner-Gulland, Eleanor J
  • Moro, Mirko
  • Naiman, Loiruck C

Illegal hunting for bushmeat is regarded as an important cause of biodiversity decline in Africa. We use a stated preferences method to obtain information on determinants of demand for bushmeat in villages around the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. We estimate the effects of changes in the own price of bushmeat and in the prices of two substitute protein sources - fish and chicken. Promoting the availability of protein substitutes at lower prices would be effective at reducing pressures on wildlife. Supply-side measures that raise the price of bushmeat would also be e ffective.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19838
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Paper provided by University of Stirling, Division of Economics in its series Stirling Economics Discussion Papers with number 2014-07.

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Date of creation: Apr 2014
Handle: RePEc:stl:stledp:2014-07
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Division of Economics, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland FK9 4LA

Phone: +44 (0)1786 467473
Fax: +44 (0)1786 467469
Web page: http://www.econ.stir.ac.uk/

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  1. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 1999. "Distribution-free estimation of some nonlinear panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 77-97, May.
  2. Christian A. Vossler & Maurice Doyon & Daniel Rondeau, 2012. "Truth in Consequentiality: Theory and Field Evidence on Discrete Choice Experiments," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 145-171, November.
  3. Maynard, Leigh J. & Hartell, Jason G. & Meyer, A. Lee & Hao, Jianqiang, 2004. "An experimental approach to valuing new differentiated products," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 317-325, December.
  4. Rentsch, Dennis & Damon, Amy, 2013. "Prices, poaching, and protein alternatives: An analysis of bushmeat consumption around Serengeti National Park, Tanzania," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-9.
  5. List John A. & Sinha Paramita & Taylor Michael H., 2006. "Using Choice Experiments to Value Non-Market Goods and Services: Evidence from Field Experiments," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-39, January.
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