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Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?

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  • Nicholas E. Piggott
  • Thomas L. Marsh

Abstract

A theoretical model of consumer response to publicized food safety information on meat demand is developed with an empirical application to U.S. meat consumption. Evidence is found for the existence of pre-committed levels of consumption, seasonal factors, time trends, and contemporaneous own- and cross-commodity food safety concerns. The average demand response to food safety concerns is small, especially in comparison to price effects, and to previous estimates of health related issues. This small average effect masks periods of significantly larger responses corresponding with prominent food safety events, but these larger impacts are short-lived with no apparent food safety lagged effects on demand. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:86:y:2004:i:1:p:154-174
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.0092-5853.2004.00569.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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