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Wildlife Conservation Policies and Incentives to Hunt: An empirical analysis of illegal hunting in western Serengeti, Tanzania

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This paper investigates factors determining participation and effort in illegal hunting, using cross-section survey data from households in western Serengeti, Tanzania. One purpose of the analysis is to study the impact on illegal hunting of the integrated conservation and development project established in this area, namely the Serengeti Regional Conservation Project (SRCP). The paper also investigates how the pattern of crop production in agriculture, market accessibility and wildlife-induced damage to crops and domestic animals affect illegal hunting. The empirical results suggest that effort in illegal hunting is inversely related to participation in SRCP. The results also show that the likelihood of illegal hunting is a decreasing function of the amount of agricultural land cultivated for maize production. Further, the hunting effort is negatively related to the size of cotton- and maize land, as well as wildlife-induced damage to crops and domestic animals.

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  • Anne Borge Johannesen, 2004. "Wildlife Conservation Policies and Incentives to Hunt: An empirical analysis of illegal hunting in western Serengeti, Tanzania," Working Paper Series 3804, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:3804
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    File URL: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/2004/3WPAnne2.pdf
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    1. Erwin H. Bulte & G. Cornelis van Kooten, 1999. "Economics of Antipoaching Enforcement and the Ivory Trade Ban," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 453-466.
    2. Gibson, Clark C. & Marks, Stuart A., 1995. "Transforming rural hunters into conservationists: An assessment of community-based wildlife management programs in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 941-957, June.
    3. Brandon, Katrina Eadie & Wells, Michael, 1992. "Planning for people and parks: Design dilemmas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 557-570, April.
    4. Christopher B. Barrett & Peter Arcese, 1998. "Wildlife Harvest in Integrated Conservation and Development Projects: Linking Harvest to Household Demand, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Shocks in the Serengeti," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(4), pages 449-465.
    5. Barrett, Christopher B. & Arcese, Peter, 1995. "Are Integrated Conservation-Development Projects (ICDPs) Sustainable? On the conservation of large mammals in sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1073-1084, July.
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