IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pba627.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Afua Branoah Banful

Personal Details

First Name:Afua
Middle Name:Branoah
Last Name:Banful
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba627

Affiliation

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.ifpri.org/

: 202-862-5600
202-467-4439
1201 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005-3915
RePEc:edi:ifprius (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Banful, Afua B. & Nkonya, Ephraim & Oboh, Victor, 2010. "Constraints to fertilizer use in Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1010, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Krausova, Marika & Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Overview of the agricultural input sector in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1024, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Old problems in the new solutions?," IFPRI discussion papers 1002, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2009. "Do institutions limit clientelism?: A study of the district assemblies common fund in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 855, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.
  2. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Do formula-based intergovernmental transfer mechanisms eliminate politically motivated targeting? Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 380-390, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Banful, Afua B. & Nkonya, Ephraim & Oboh, Victor, 2010. "Constraints to fertilizer use in Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1010, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2014. "Farmer groups and input access: When membership is not enough," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 37-49.
    2. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale O., 2017. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use for maize production in SSA a profitable proposition? Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 41-51.
    3. Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Olaniyan, Babatunde & Salau, Sheu & Sackey, James, 2010. "A review of fertilizer policy issues in Nigeria:," NSSP working papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Fertilizer Subsidies and Smallholder Commercial Fertilizer Purchases: Crowding out, Leakage, and Policy Implications for Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 146933, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2015. "Fertilizer subsidies, political influence and local food prices in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-24.
    6. World Bank, 2011. "Improving Governance for Scaling up SLM in Mali," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2751, The World Bank.
    7. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Deb, Sayon, 2012. "Impact of fertilizer subsidies on the commercial fertilizer sector in Nigeria:: Evidence from previous fertilizer subsidy schemes," NSSP working papers 23, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale, 2015. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa a profitable proposition ? evidence from Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7201, The World Bank.
    9. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Did using input vouchers improve the distribution of subsidized fertilizer in Nigeria?: The case of Kano and Taraba states," IFPRI discussion papers 1231, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

  2. Krausova, Marika & Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Overview of the agricultural input sector in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1024, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Bumb, Balu L. & Johnson, Michael E. & Fuentes, Porfirio A., 2011. "Policy options for improving regional fertilizer markets in West Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1084, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Adu-Gyamfi Poku & Regina Birner & Saurabh Gupta, 2018. "Why do maize farmers in Ghana have a limited choice of improved seed varieties? An assessment of the governance challenges in seed supply," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(1), pages 27-46, February.
    3. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.
    4. Tripp, Robert & Mensah-Bonsu, Akwesi, 2013. "Ghana's commercial seed sector: New incentives or continued complacency?:," GSSP working papers 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, 2014. "Fertilizer subsidies and private market participation: the case of Kano State, Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(6), pages 663-678, November.

  3. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2010. "Old problems in the new solutions?," IFPRI discussion papers 1002, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Vondolia, Godwin K., 2011. "Nudging Boserup? The impact of fertilizer subsidies on investment in soil and water conservation," Working Papers in Economics 509, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Bentry Mkwara & Dan Marsh, 2011. "Effects of Maize Fertilizer Subsidies on Food Security in Malawi," Working Papers in Economics 11/14, University of Waikato.
    3. Pan, Lei & Christiaensen, Luc, 2012. "Who is Vouching for the Input Voucher? Decentralized Targeting and Elite Capture in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1619-1633.
    4. Smale, Melinda & Birol, Ekin, 2013. "Smallholder Demand for Maize Hybrids and Selective Seed Subsidies in Zambia," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161474, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    5. Mason, Nicole M. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2012. "Disrupting Demand for Commercial Seed: Input Subsidies in Malawi and Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 123554, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jones, Michael, 2012. "Does Access to Storage Protectant Increase Smallholder Adoption of Improved Maize Seed? Insights from Malawi," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124658, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Mkwara, Bentry, 2013. "To what extent do fertiliser subsidies improve household income and reduce poverty? The case of Malawi," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), October.

  4. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2009. "Do institutions limit clientelism?: A study of the district assemblies common fund in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 855, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Horowitz, Leah & Palaniswamy, Nethra, 2010. "In pursuit of votes: The capture of the allocation of local public goods by the central state in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1039, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Akramov, Kamiljon T. & Asante, Felix Ankomah, 2008. "Decentralization and local public services in Ghana: Do geography and ethnic diversity matter?," GSSP working papers 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Frédéric Gaspart & Pierre Pecher, 2015. "Ethnic inclusiveness of the central state government and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2015011, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    4. Mogues, Tewodaj & Benin, Samuel & Cudjoe, Godsway, 2009. "Do external grants to district governments discourage own-revenue generation?: A look at local public finance dynamics in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 934, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Old Problems in the New Solutions? Politically Motivated Allocation of Program Benefits and the "New" Fertilizer Subsidies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1166-1176, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2018. "Review: Taking stock of Africa’s second-generation agricultural input subsidy programs," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-14.
    2. Sheahan, Megan & Olwande, John & Kirimi, Lilian & Jayne, T.S., 2014. "Targeting Of Subsidized Fertilizer Under Kenya’s National Accelerated Agricultural Input Access Program (NAAIAP)," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 188572, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Jayne, T.S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2016. "Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs in Africa: An Assessment of Recent Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 245892, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2014. "Farmer groups and input access: When membership is not enough," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 37-49.
    5. Pan, Lei & Christiaensen, Luc, 2012. "Who is Vouching for the Input Voucher? Decentralized Targeting and Elite Capture in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1619-1633.
    6. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Targeted Subsidies and Private Market Participation: An Assessment of Fertilizer Demand in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1194, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Dzanku, Fred M., 2015. "Household-specific food price differentials and high-value crop production in rural Ghana," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 73-82.
    8. Smale, Melinda & Simpungwe, Eliab & Birol, Ekin & De Groote, Hugo & Mutale, Raphael, 2013. "The Changing Structure of the Maize Seed Industry in Zambia: Prospects for Orange Maize," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161476, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    9. Lambrecht, Isabel & Vanlauwe, Bernard & Merckx, Roel & Maertens, Miet, 2013. "Understanding the process of agricultural technology adoption: mineral fertilizer in eastern DR Congo," Working Papers 157388, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    10. Nicole M. Mason & Thomas S. Jayne & Nicolas van de Walle, 2017. "The Political Economy of Fertilizer Subsidy Programs in Africa: Evidence from Zambia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 99(3), pages 705-731.
    11. Larson, Donald F. & Gurara, Daniel Zerfu, 2013. "A conceptual model of incomplete markets and the consequences for technology adoption policies in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6681, The World Bank.
    12. Estelle Koussoubé & Céline Nauges, 2015. "Returns to fertilizer use: does it pay enough? Some new evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers DT/2015/07, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    13. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Walle, Nicolas van de, 2013. "Fertilizer Subsidies and Voting Patterns: Political Economy Dimensions of Input Subsidy Programs," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149580, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    14. Dionne, Kim Yi & Horowitz, Jeremy, 2016. "The Political Effects of Agricultural Subsidies in Africa: Evidence from Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 215-226.
    15. Smale, Melinda & Birol, Ekin, 2013. "Smallholder Demand for Maize Hybrids and Selective Seed Subsidies in Zambia," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161474, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    16. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Fertilizer Subsidies and Smallholder Commercial Fertilizer Purchases: Crowding out, Leakage, and Policy Implications for Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 146933, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    17. Wiemers, Alice, 2015. "A “Time of Agric”: Rethinking the “Failure” of Agricultural Programs in 1970s Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 104-117.
    18. Blessings Chinsinga & Colin Poulton, 2014. "Beyond Technocratic Debates: The Significance and Transience of Political Incentives in the Malawi Farm Input Subsidy Programme (FISP)," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(s2), pages 123-150, September.
    19. Mason, Nicole M. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob, 2012. "Disrupting Demand for Commercial Seed: Input Subsidies in Malawi and Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 123554, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    20. Watson, Derrill D., 2013. "Political Economy Synthesis: the Food Policy Crisis," WIDER Working Paper Series 050, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    21. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Do Fertilizer Subsidies Boost Staple Crop Production and Reduce Poverty Across the Distribution of Smallholders in Africa? Quantile Regression Results from Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126742, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    22. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2015. "Fertilizer subsidies, political influence and local food prices in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-24.
    23. Chatura Sewwandi Wijetunga & Katsuhiro Saito, 2017. "Evaluating the Fertilizer Subsidy Reforms in the Rice Production Sector in Sri Lanka: A Simulation Analysis," Advances in Management and Applied Economics, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(1), pages 1-3.
    24. Scheiterle, Lilli & Birner, Regina, 2016. "Comparative advantage and factors affecting maize production in Northern Ghana: A Policy Analysis Matrix Study," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 249277, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    25. Aparajita Goyal & John Nash, 2017. "Reaping Richer Returns," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 25996, August.
    26. Andreas Gerber, 2016. "Short-Term Success versus Long-Term Failure: A Simulation-Based Approach for Understanding the Potential of Zambia’s Fertilizer Subsidy Program in Enhancing Maize Availability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-17, October.
    27. Paul Mosley, 2012. "The politics of what works for the poor in public expenditure and taxation: a review," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-011-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    28. Westberg, Nina Bruvik, 2015. "Exchanging fertilizer for votes?," Working Paper Series 12-2015, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, School of Economics and Business.
    29. David L. Mather & Thomas S. Jayne, 2018. "Fertilizer subsidies and the role of targeting in crowding out: evidence from Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(2), pages 397-417, April.
    30. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Myers, Robert J., 2012. "Smallholder Behavioral Responses to Marketing Board Activities in a Dual Channel Marketing System: The Case of Maize in Zambia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126927, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    31. Renkow, Mitch, 2010. "Impacts of IFPRI's "priorities for pro-poor public investment" global research program:," Impact assessments 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    32. Chapoto, Antony & Ragasa, Catherine, 2013. "Moving in the right direction? Maize productivity and fertilizer use and use intensity in Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1314, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    33. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale, 2015. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa a profitable proposition ? evidence from Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7201, The World Bank.
    34. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis, 2015. "Is fertilizer use really suboptimnal in sub-Saharan Africa? The case of rice in Nigeria," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212053, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    35. Valbuena, Diego & Tui, Sabine Homann-Kee & Erenstein, Olaf & Teufel, Nils & Duncan, Alan & Abdoulaye, Tahirou & Swain, Braja & Mekonnen, Kindu & Germaine, Ibro & Gérard, Bruno, 2015. "Identifying determinants, pressures and trade-offs of crop residue use in mixed smallholder farms in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 107-118.
    36. Mogues, Tewodaj & Erman, Alvina, 2016. "Institutional arrangements to make public spending responsive to the poor—(where) have they worked?: Review of the evidence on four major intervention types," IFPRI discussion papers 1519, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    37. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Did using input vouchers improve the distribution of subsidized fertilizer in Nigeria?: The case of Kano and Taraba states," IFPRI discussion papers 1231, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    38. Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, 2017. "Is fertiliser use inconsistent with expected profit maximization in sub-Saharan Africa? “Evidence from Nigeria”," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(1), pages 22-44, February.
    39. Birner, Regina & Anderson, Jock R., 2015. "Strengthening Agricultural Governance in an Interconnected World," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211345, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    40. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, T.S. & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda, 2013. "A Review of Zambia’s Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs: Targeting, Impacts, and the Way Forward," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 162438, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    41. Ton, Giel & Klerkx, Laurens & de Grip, Karin & Rau, Marie-Luise, 2015. "Innovation grants to smallholder farmers: Revisiting the key assumptions in the impact pathways," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 9-23.
    42. Smale, Melinda & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "Hybrid Seed, Income, and Inequality among Smallholder Maize Farmers in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 146929, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    43. Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie, 2014. "Fertilizer subsidies and private market participation: the case of Kano State, Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(6), pages 663-678, November.
    44. Murathi Kiratu, Nixon, 2014. "An Assessment of the Impact of Kilimo Plus Subsidy Program on Smallholder Farmers' Food Security and Income in Nakuru North District, Kenya," Research Theses 243470, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    45. World Bank Group, "undated". "Africa's Pulse, No. 14, October 2016," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25097, The World Bank.
    46. Colin Poulton, 2014. "Democratisation and the Political Incentives for Agricultural Policy in Africa," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(s2), pages 101-122, September.

  2. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2011. "Do formula-based intergovernmental transfer mechanisms eliminate politically motivated targeting? Evidence from Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 380-390, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Pierre Andre & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2010. "Politics and the geographic allocation of public funds in a semi-democracy. The case of Ghana, 1996 - 2004," PSE - G-MOND WORKING PAPERS halshs-00962698, HAL.
    2. Muhammad Haseeb & Kate Vyborny, 2016. "Imposing institutions: Evidence from cash transfer reform in Pakistan," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-36, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    3. Sandhya Garg, 2015. "Spatial convergence in public expenditure across Indian states: Implication of federal transfers," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2015-028, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2015. "Mali; Technical Assistance Report - Local Taxation and Decentralization," IMF Staff Country Reports 15/291, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Jennes, Geert & Persyn, Damiaan, 2015. "The effect of political representation on the geographic distribution of income: Evidence using Belgian data," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 178-194.
    6. Björn Kauder & Niklas Potrafke & Markus Reischmann, 2016. "Do Politicians Reward Core Supporters? Evidence from a Discretionary Grant Program," CESifo Working Paper Series 6097, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Emilie Caldeira & Grégoire Rota-Graziosi, 2015. "La décentralisation dans les pays en développement : une revue de la littérature - Decentralization in developing countries: A literature review," Working Papers halshs-01005204, HAL.
    8. Giampaolo Garzarelli & Lyndal Keeton, 2016. "Policy Experimentation and Intergovernmental Grants in a Federal System," Working Papers 8/16, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    9. Pierre André & Sandrine Mesplé-Somps, 2017. "Sitting on the fence: Pork - barrels and democratization under threat of conflict. The case of Ghana, 1996 - 2004," Working Papers hal-01619605, HAL.
    10. Brice Fabre, 2017. "Political Colleagues Matter: The Impact of Multiple Office-Holding on Intergovernmental Grants," PSE Working Papers halshs-01596149, HAL.
    11. Emilie CALDEIRA, 2011. "Does the system of allocation of intergovernmental transfers in Senegal eliminate politically motivated targeting?," Working Papers 201105, CERDI.
    12. Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai & Sam Hickey, 2014. "Rethinking the politics of development in Africa? How the 'political settlement' shapes resource allocation in Ghana," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-038-14, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    13. Jean-Francois Maystadt & Muhammad Kabir Salihu, 2015. "National or political cake?," Working Papers 100756558, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    14. André, Pierre & Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine, 2011. "The Allocation of Public Goods and National Elections in Ghana," MPRA Paper 29873, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Renkow, Mitch, 2010. "Impacts of IFPRI's "priorities for pro-poor public investment" global research program:," Impact assessments 31, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Kauder, Björn & Björn, Kauder & Niklas, Potrafke & Markus, Reischmann, 2016. "Do politicians gratify core supporters? Evidence from a discretionary grant program," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145509, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Dey, Subhasish & Sen, Kunal, 2016. "Is Partisan Alignment Electorally Rewarding? Evidence from Village Council Elections in India," IZA Discussion Papers 9994, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Gerrit J. Gonschorek & Günther G. Schulze & Bambang Suharnoko Sjahrir, 2018. "To the ones in need or the ones you need? The Political Economy of Central Discretionary Grants − Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Discussion Paper Series 36, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Jan 2018.
    19. Mahamudu Bawumia & Håvard Halland, 2017. "Oil discovery and macroeconomic management: The recent Ghanaian experience," WIDER Working Paper Series 185, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    20. Boakye, Daniel & Dessus, Sebastien & Foday, Yusuf & Oppong, Felix, 2012. "Investing mineral wealth in development assets : Ghana, Liberia and Sierra Leone," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6089, The World Bank.
    21. Cazor Katz, Andre & Acuña, Hector & Carrasco, Diego & Carrasco, Martín, 2017. "Transferencias como Canal de Ventaja Electoral: El Caso de Chile
      [Discretionary Government Transfers to Catch Votes: The Case of Chile]
      ," MPRA Paper 83668, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Verena Kroth & Valentino Larcinese & Joachim Wehner, 2016. "A Better Life for All? Democratization and Electrification in Post-Apartheid South Africa," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 60, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    23. Mogues, Tewodaj & Benin, Samuel & Cudjoe, Godsway, 2009. "Do external grants to district governments discourage own-revenue generation?: A look at local public finance dynamics in Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 934, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    24. Jean-François BRUN & Tiangboho SANOGO, 2017. "Effect of central transfers on municipalities’ own revenue mobilization: Do conflict and local revenue management matter?," Working Papers 201716, CERDI.
    25. Fossati, Diego, 2016. "Beyond “Good Governance”: The Multi-level Politics of Health Insurance for the Poor in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 291-306.
    26. Jean-François Brun & Tiangboho Sanogo, 2017. "Effect of central transfers on municipalities' own revenue mobilization: Do conflict and local revenue management matter?," Working Papers halshs-01613108, HAL.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (4) 2009-04-18 2010-07-31 2010-09-25 2010-09-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (2) 2009-04-18 2010-07-31. Author is listed
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2010-09-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2009-04-18. Author is listed
  5. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2009-04-18. Author is listed

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Afua Branoah Banful should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.