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Constraints to fertilizer use in Nigeria

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  • Banful, Afua B.
  • Nkonya, Ephraim
  • Oboh, Victor

Abstract

Fertilizer consumption rates in Nigeria remains among the lowest in the world despite decades of aggressive subsidization. The extension service in Nigeria has a double-edged impact on fertilizer use in the country; not only can their activities increase farmers’ demand for fertilizer, but also the organizational framework of the service, Agricultural Development Programs, is the major source of fertilizer for farmers. To provide insights on the reasons for the low fertilizer use in Nigeria, this paper presents an analysis of the extension service as well as some perspectives of village extension agents. We find that the reach of the extension service is severely limited by low staff. The main technology transmitted is the use of improved seeds. Fertilizer technology is seldom transmitted and very rarely is irrigation taught. Furthermore, extension agents are found to have gaps in their knowledge of fertilizer technology. Extension agents routinely distribute agricultural inputs and many see their advisory role as secondary to this function. Extension agents identified the primary constraint to fertilizer use in Nigeria as the physical absence of the product at the time that it is needed, rather than lack of affordability or farmers’ lack of knowledge about the benefits or the use of fertilizer.

Suggested Citation

  • Banful, Afua B. & Nkonya, Ephraim & Oboh, Victor, 2010. "Constraints to fertilizer use in Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1010, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1010
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01010.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Minot, Nicholas & Benson, Todd, 2009. "Fertilizer subsidies in Africa: Are vouchers the answer?," Issue briefs 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale O., 2017. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use for maize production in SSA a profitable proposition? Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 41-51.
    2. Nicole M. Mason & Thomas S. Jayne, 2014. "Fertiliser subsidies and smallholder commercial fertiliser purchases: crowding out, leakage, and policy implications for Zambia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 527-528, June.
    3. Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Olaniyan, Babatunde & Salau, Sheu & Sackey, James, 2010. "A review of fertilizer policy issues in Nigeria:," NSSP working papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2015. "Fertilizer subsidies, political influence and local food prices in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Nigeria," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-24.
    5. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Did using input vouchers improve the distribution of subsidized fertilizer in Nigeria?: The case of Kano and Taraba states," IFPRI discussion papers 1231, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. World Bank, 2011. "Improving Governance for Scaling up SLM in Mali," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2751, The World Bank.
    7. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale, 2015. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa a profitable proposition ? evidence from Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7201, The World Bank.
    8. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O., 2014. "Farmer groups and input access: When membership is not enough," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 37-49.
    9. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Deb, Sayon, 2012. "Impact of fertilizer subsidies on the commercial fertilizer sector in Nigeria:: Evidence from previous fertilizer subsidy schemes," NSSP working papers 23, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural growth and technologies; Extension; Fertilizer; Subsidies;

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