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The last mile(s) in modern input distribution: Evidence from northwestern Ethiopia

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  • Minten, Bart
  • Koro, Bethlehem
  • Stifel, David

Abstract

Based on unique data from a quasi-experimental setting in northwestern Ethiopia, this study examines the “last mile(s)”—from the input distribution center to the farmer—in the chemical fertilizer and improved seed distribution system. We find that increasing transaction and transportation costs over a 35 kilometer distance, along a route mainly accessible to foot traffic only, lead to a 50 percent increase of the prices of chemical fertilizer and to a 75 percent reduction in its use.
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  • Minten, Bart & Koro, Bethlehem & Stifel, David, 2013. "The last mile(s) in modern input distribution: Evidence from northwestern Ethiopia," ESSP research notes 24, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:essprn:24
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Estelle Koussoubé & Céline Nauges, 2017. "Returns to fertiliser use: Does it pay enough? Some new evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 183-210.
    2. Bachewe, Fantu Nisrane & Berhane, Guush & Minten, Bart & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum, 2015. "Agricultural growth in Ethiopia (2004-2014): Evidence and drivers:," ESSP working papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Enid M. Katungi & Catherine Larochelle & Josephat R. Mugabo & Robin Buruchara, 2018. "The effect of climbing bean adoption on the welfare of smallholder common bean growers in Rwanda," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(1), pages 61-79, February.
    4. Kibrom A. Abay & Guush Berhane & Garrick Blalock, 2018. "Locus of Control and Technology Adoption in Africa: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers PMMA 2018-04, PEP-PMMA.

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