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Moving off the farm and intensifying agricultural production in Shandong: a case study of rural labor market linkages in China

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  • Jikun Huang
  • Yunhua Wu
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

This study examines linkages between off‐farm labor markets and the labor allocated by farmers to on‐farm production of fruit crops. Using a stratified random sample of rural households in Shandong Province, we find that young and educated members of the labor force tend to work more frequently in the off‐farm labor market, and that off‐farm employment reduces the likelihood and intensity of fruit production. Fruit production is associated with lower levels of off‐farm employment. Households and individuals who are less likely (or able) to find off‐farm employment can benefit from shifting into fruit production. Although off‐farm employment is an important avenue out of poverty, fruit production provides ways for the less educated and older households to raise their income.

Suggested Citation

  • Jikun Huang & Yunhua Wu & Scott Rozelle, 2009. "Moving off the farm and intensifying agricultural production in Shandong: a case study of rural labor market linkages in China," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(2), pages 203-218, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:40:y:2009:i:2:p:203-218
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1574-0862.2009.00370.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-0862.2009.00370.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bowlus, Audra J. & Sicular, Terry, 2003. "Moving toward markets? Labor allocation in rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 561-583, August.
    2. Jian Zhang & Linxiu Zhang & Scott Rozelle & Steve Boucher, 2006. "Self-Employment With Chinese Characteristics: The Forgotten Engine Of Rural China'S Growth," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(3), pages 446-458, July.
    3. Tao Yang, Dennis, 2004. "Education and allocative efficiency: household income growth during rural reforms in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 137-162, June.
    4. Ahituv, Avner & Kimhi, Ayal, 2002. "Off-farm work and capital accumulation decisions of farmers over the life-cycle: the role of heterogeneity and state dependence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 329-353, August.
    5. Alan De Brauw & Scott Rozelle, 2008. "Reconciling the Returns to Education in Off‐Farm Wage Employment in Rural China," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 57-71, February.
    6. Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Wang, Xiaobing, 2008. "Labor market participation of Chinese agricultural households: Empirical evidence from Zhejiang province," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 329-340, August.
    7. Wang, Xiaobing & Herzfeld, Thomas & Glauben, Thomas, 2007. "Labor allocation in transition: Evidence from Chinese rural households," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 287-308.
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