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Horticulture exports, agro-industrialization, and farm-nonfarm linkages with the smallholder farm sector: evidence from Senegal

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  • Miet Maertens

Abstract

In this article we address the question of farm-nonfarm linkages at the household level in Senegal. We examine whether increasing off-farm employment opportunities for rural households-resulting from increased horticulture exports and associated agro-industrialization-has benefitted the smallholder farm sector through investment linkages. We use data from a household survey in the main horticulture export region in Senegal. We find that access to unskilled employment in the export agro-industry has contributed to the alleviation of farmers' liquidity constraints, resulting in increased smallholder agricultural production. Copyright (c) 2009 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

Suggested Citation

  • Miet Maertens, 2009. "Horticulture exports, agro-industrialization, and farm-nonfarm linkages with the smallholder farm sector: evidence from Senegal," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(2), pages 219-229, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:40:y:2009:i:2:p:219-229
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    1. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter & Brown, James, 1989. "Farm-nonfarm linkages in rural sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(8), pages 1173-1201, August.
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    9. Abdulai, Awudu & CroleRees, Anna, 2001. "Determinants of income diversification amongst rural households in Southern Mali," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 437-452, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. M. Maertens & J. Swinnen, 2012. "Private Standards, the Organization of Global Supply Chains, and their Impact on Developing Countries," Chapters,in: Private Standards and Global Governance, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Van den Broeck, Goedele & Maertens, Miet, 2014. "Does female employment reduce fertility rates? Evidence from the Senegalese horticultural export sector," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182715, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2013. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from Senegal," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 118-131.
    4. Goedele Van den Broeck & Kaat Van Hoyweghen & Miet Maertens, 2016. "Employment Conditions in the Senegalese Horticultural Export Industry: A Worker Perspective," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(2), pages 301-319, March.
    5. Benjamin Davis & Paul Winters & Thomas Reardon & Kostas Stamoulis, 2009. "Rural nonfarm employment and farming: household-level linkages," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(2), pages 119-123, March.
    6. Rao, Elizaphan J.O. & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "The supermarket revolution and impacts on agricultural labor markets: Empirical evidence from Kenya," Discussion Papers 107745, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    7. Rao, Elizaphan J.O. & Qaim, Matin, 2013. "Supermarkets and agricultural labor demand in Kenya: A gendered perspective," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 165-176.
    8. Maertens, Miet & Verhofstadt, Ellen, 2012. "Horticultural exports, female wage employment and primary school enrolment: Theory and evidence from a natural quasi-experiment in Senegal," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126856, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Maertens, Miet & Swinnen, Johan, 2015. "Agricultural trade and development: A value chain perspective," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2015-04, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    10. repec:zbw:espost:176893 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:95-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Miet Maertens & Bart Minten & Jo Swinnen, 2009. "Growth in high-value export markets in Sub-Saharan Africa and its development implications," LICOS Discussion Papers 24509, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    13. Benjamin Tetteh Anang, 2017. "Effect of non-farm work on agricultural productivity: Empirical evidence from northern Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series 038, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    14. Riera, Olivia & Swinnen, Johan, 2016. "Household level spillover effects from biofuels: Evidence from castor in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 55-65.
    15. Olivia Riera & Johan Swinnen, 2014. "Household level spillover effects from biofuels," LICOS Discussion Papers 35614, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    16. VAN DEN BROECK, Goedele & MAERTENS, Miet, 2016. "Horticultural exports and food security in developing countries," Working Papers 232595, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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