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Factors influencing adoption and intensity of adoption of orange flesh sweetpotato varieties: evidence from an extension intervention in Nyanza and Western province, Kenya

  • Kaguongo, Wachira
  • Ortmann, Gerald F.
  • Wale, Edilegnaw
  • Darroch, Mark A.G.
  • Low, Jan W.
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    This study applied logit and logit transformed regression to examine factors affecting the adoption of orange flesh sweet-potatoes (OFSP), and intensity of such adoption, by a representative sample of 340 farmers in the Busia and Rachuonyo districts of Kenya in 2009. The study also investigated whether participation in a value chain extension intervention programme increased these farmers’ likelihood of adopting OFSP. The results suggest that the district where the farmer comes from, knowledge on value addition and nutritional benefits, and availability of vines were the key factors for adoption. The results also suggest that participation in a value chain extension programme enhanced the probability of adoption. Factors affecting intensity of adoption were site, value addition, vines availability, level of commercialization and having a child of up to five years.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/96805
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    Paper provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) & Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA) in its series 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa with number 96805.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae10:96805
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