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Measuring living standards with proxy variables

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  • Mark Montgomery

    ()

  • Michele Gragnolati
  • Kathleen Burke
  • Edmundo Paredes

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  • Mark Montgomery & Michele Gragnolati & Kathleen Burke & Edmundo Paredes, 2000. "Measuring living standards with proxy variables," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(2), pages 155-174, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:37:y:2000:i:2:p:155-174
    DOI: 10.2307/2648118
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric Jensen, 1996. "The fertility impact of alternative family planning distribution channels in Indonesia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 153-165, May.
    2. MacKinnon, James G, 1992. "Model Specification Tests and Artificial Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 102-146, March.
    3. Samuel H. Preston & Michael R. Haines, 1991. "Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth-Century America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number pres91-1.
    4. David Hamill & Amy Tsui & Shyam Thapa, 1990. "Determinants of contraceptive switching behavior in rural Sri Lanka," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(4), pages 559-578, November.
    5. Michael Koenig & James Phillips & Oona Campbell & Stan D'Souza, 1990. "Birth Intervals and Childhood Mortality in Rural Bangladesh," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(2), pages 251-265, May.
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