IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/joaaec/15392.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seeds And Use Of Inorganic Fertilizer For Maize Production In The Intermediate And Lowland Zones Of Tanzania

Author

Listed:
  • Kaliba, Aloyce R.
  • Verkuijl, Hugo
  • Mwangi, Wilfred

Abstract

This paper examines factors influencing the adoption of improved maize seeds and the use of inorganic fertilizer for maize production by farmers in the intermediate and lowland zones of Tanzania. The results indicate that availability of extension services, on-farm field trials, variety characteristics and rainfall were the most important factors that influenced the extent of adopting improved maize seeds and the use of inorganic fertilizer for maize production. Farmers preferred those varieties which minimize field loss rather than maximizing yields. Future research and extension policies should emphasize farmer participation in the research process and on-farm trials for varietal evaluation and demonstration purposes.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaliba, Aloyce R. & Verkuijl, Hugo & Mwangi, Wilfred, 2000. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seeds And Use Of Inorganic Fertilizer For Maize Production In The Intermediate And Lowland Zones Of Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15392
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/15392
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Misra, S. K. & Carley, D. H. & Fletcher, S. M., 1993. "Factors Influencing Southern Dairy Farmers' Choice of Milk Handlers," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(01), pages 197-207, July.
    2. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
    3. Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1983. "Stochastic Structure, Farm Size and Technology Adoption in Developing Agriculture," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 307-328, July.
    4. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    5. Misra, Sukant K. & Carley, Dale H. & Fletcher, Stanley M., 1993. "Factors Influencing Southern Dairy Farmers' Choice Of Milk Handlers," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 25(01), July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Raghu, Prabhakaran T. & Erenstein, Olaf & Böber, Christian & Krishna, Vijesh V., 0. "Adoption and Outcomes of Hybrid Maize in the Marginal Areas of India," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    2. Silamana Barry, 2016. "The determinants of adoption of improved varieties of sesame in northern Burkina Faso," Asian Journal of Agriculture and rural Development, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(9), pages 163-174, September.
    3. Sesmero, Juan P. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob E. & Cook, Aaron M., 2015. "How do African Farm Households Adapt to Climate Change? A Structural Analysis from Malawi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212688, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Holden, Stein & Mangisoni, Julius, 2013. "Input subsidies and improved maize varieties in Malawi: -What can we learn from the impacts in a drought year?," CLTS Working Papers 7/13, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Centre for Land Tenure Studies.
    5. Christina Handschuch & Meike Wollni, 2016. "Improved production systems for traditional food crops: the case of finger millet in western Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(4), pages 783-797, August.
    6. Hosu, Sunday & Sibanda, Melusi & Mushunje, Abbyssinia, 2013. "Scenario simulation of small farms’ production efficiencies in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161461, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    7. Bernard, Munyua & Hellin, Jonathan & Nyikal, Rose Adhiambo & Mburu, John G., 2010. "Determinants for Use of Certified Maize Seed and the Relative Importance of Transaction Costs," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96423, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    8. Kaguongo, Wachira & Ortmann, Gerald F. & Wale, Edilegnaw & Darroch, Mark A.G. & Low, Jan W., 2010. "Factors influencing adoption and intensity of adoption of orange flesh sweetpotato varieties: evidence from an extension intervention in Nyanza and Western province, Kenya," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96805, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    9. Christina Handschuch & Meike Wollni, 2013. "Improved production systems for traditional food crops: The case of finger millet in Western Kenya," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 141, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    10. Tubetov, Dulat & Musshoff, Oliver & Kellner, Ulla, 0. "Investments in Kazakhstani Dairy Farming: A Comparison of Classical Investment Theory and the Real Options Approach," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 51.
    11. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele & Simtowe, Franklin & Lipper, Leslie, 2012. "Impact of modern agricultural technologies on smallholder welfare: Evidence from Tanzania and Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 283-295.
    12. Jonathan Isham, 2002. "The Effect of Social Capital on Fertiliser Adoption: Evidence from Rural Tanzania," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 11(1), pages 39-60, March.
    13. Gitonga, Zachary M. & De Groote, Hugo, 2016. "Role of hybrid maize adoption on food security in Kenya: an application of two-step generalized method of moments (gmm2s)," 2016 AAAE Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246315, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    14. van Rijn, Fédes & Bulte, Erwin & Adekunle, Adewale, 2012. "Social capital and agricultural innovation in Sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 112-122.
    15. Maurice Ogada & Germano Mwabu & Diana Muchai, 2014. "Farm technology adoption in Kenya: a simultaneous estimation of inorganic fertilizer and improved maize variety adoption decisions," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-18, December.
    16. Wiredu, Alexander Nimo & Zeller, Manfred & Diagne, Aliou, 0. "What Determines Adoption of Fertilizers among Rice-Producing Households in Northern Ghana?," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 54.
    17. Xu, Zhiying & Jayne, Thomas S. & Govereh, Jones, 2006. "Input Subsidy Programs and Commercial Market Development: Modeling Fertilizer Use Decisions in a Two-Channel Marketing System," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21270, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    18. Asfaw, Solomon & McCarty, Nancy & Lipper, Leslie & Arslan, Aslihan & Cattaneo, Andrea, 2013. "Adaptation to Climate Change and Food Security: Micro-evidence from Malawi," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161646, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    19. Acheampong, Patricia & Owusu, Victor, 2015. "Impact of Improved cassava varieties' adoption on farmers' incomes in Rural Ghana," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210875, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    20. Cook, Aaron M. & Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob E. & Sesmero, Juan P., 2013. "How do African households adapt to climate change? Evidence from Malawi," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150507, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    21. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2014. "Understanding the agricultural input landscape in Sub-Saharan Africa : recent plot, household, and community-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7014, The World Bank.
    22. Mwangi, Backson & Obare, Gideon A. & Murage, Alice, 0. "Estimating the Adoption Rates of Two Contrasting Striga Weeds Control Technologies in Kenya," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, vol. 53.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15392. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/saeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.