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How do African households adapt to climate change? Evidence from Malawi

  • Cook, Aaron M.
  • Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob E.
  • Sesmero, Juan P.
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    We use three waves of national representative household level panel data from Malawi to employ a structural model to estimate how households make land and labor allocation decisions in response to climate change. We first model the allocation of land to improved maize varieties as a function of precipitation history, input and output prices, household characteristics and extension advice and then estimate the welfare benefits associated with this decision in a household net income equation. This second stage also reveals the extent to which the household shift labor off-farm as total growing season precipitation fluctuates. We find that a 1% increase in intra-seasonal precipitation variability reduces household income by 1.5%. This effect falls to 1.3% after we account for the expected adjustment in improved maize adoption.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/150507
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    Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. with number 150507.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea13:150507
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    1. Morris, Michael L. & Tripp, Robert & Dankyi, A.A., 1999. "Adoption and Impacts of Improved Maize Production Technology: A Case Study of the Ghana Grains Development Project," Economics Program Papers 48767, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
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    5. Mwangi, Wilfred & Mwabu, Germano & Nyangito, Hezron Omare, 2006. "Does Adoption of Improved Maize Varieties Reduce Poverty? Evidence from Kenya," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25376, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Molua, Ernest L., 2002. "Climate variability, vulnerability and effectiveness of farm-level adaptation options: the challenges and implications for food security in Southwestern Cameroon," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 529-545, July.
    7. Marcella Veronesi & Salvatore Di Falco, 2012. "How Can African Agriculture Adapt to Climate Change? A Counterfactual Analysis from Ethiopia," Working Papers 14/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    8. World Bank, 2007. "Malawi Poverty and Vulnerability Assessment : Investing in Our Future, Synthesis Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7557, The World Bank.
    9. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mungoma, Catherine, 2008. "The effect of household wealth on the adoption of improved maize varieties in Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 550-559, December.
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    13. Maddison, David, 2007. "The perception of and adaptation to climate change in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4308, The World Bank.
    14. Deressa, Temesgen Tadesse & Ringler, Claudia & Hassan, Rashid M., 2010. "Factors affecting the choices of coping strategies for climate extremes: The case of farmers in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 1032, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Apata, Temidayo Gabriel & Samuel, K.D. & Adeola, A.O., 2009. "Analysis of Climate Change Perception and Adaptation among Arable Food Crop Farmers in South Western Nigeria," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51365, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
    17. Salvatore Di Falco & Mahmud Yesuf & Gunnar Kohlin & Claudia Ringler, 2012. "Estimating the Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture in Low-Income Countries: Household Level Evidence from the Nile Basin, Ethiopia," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(4), pages 457-478, August.
    18. Kaliba, Aloyce R. & Verkuijl, Hugo & Mwangi, Wilfred, 2000. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seeds And Use Of Inorganic Fertilizer For Maize Production In The Intermediate And Lowland Zones Of Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
    19. Feleke, Shiferaw & Zegeye, Tesfaye, 2006. "Adoption of improved maize varieties in Southern Ethiopia: Factors and strategy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 442-457, October.
    20. Langyintuo, Augustine S. & Mekuria, Mulugetta, 2008. "Assessing the influence of neighborhood effects on the adoption of improved agricultural technologies in developing agriculture," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 2(2), September.
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    22. Bellon, Mauricio R. & Risopoulos, Jean, 2001. "Small-Scale Farmers Expand the Benefits of Improved Maize Germplasm: A Case Study from Chiapas, Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 799-811, May.
    23. World Bank, 2007. "Malawi - Poverty and Vulnerability Assessment : Investing in Our Future," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7909, The World Bank.
    24. World Bank, 2007. "Malawi : Poverty and Vulnerability Assessment, Investing in Our Future," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7555, The World Bank.
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