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How Can African Agriculture Adapt to Climate Change? A Counterfactual Analysis from Ethiopia

  • Marcella Veronesi

    ()

    (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

  • Salvatore Di Falco

    ()

    (London School of Economics and Political Science)

We analyze the impact of different adaptation strategies on crop net revenues in the Nile Basin of Ethiopia. We estimate a multinomial endogenous switching regression model of climate change adaptation and crop net revenues and implement a counterfactual analysis. Households data are combined with spatial climate data. We find that adaptation to climate change based upon a portfolio of strategies significantly increases farm net revenues. Changing crop varieties has a positive and significant impact on net revenues when is coupled with water conservation strategies or soil conservation strategies but not when implemented in isolation.

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Paper provided by University of Verona, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 14/2012.

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Date of creation: Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Land Economics 89(4):743-766
Handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:14/2012
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