IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Adoption of Improved Maize Seed by Smallholder Farmers in Mozambique

  • Zavale, Helder
  • Mabaya, Edward T.
  • Christy, Ralph D.
Registered author(s):

    The objective of this paper is to investigate factors influencing the adoption of improved maize seed by smallholder farmers in Mozambique. The data used in this study were obtained from a national random sample of 4,908 smallholder farmers conducted by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development in 2002. Using Probit and Logit models, the main factors influencing adoption of improved maize seed were identified. The results of this analysis indicate that fifteen out of twenty five factors are significantly found to be the determining factors influencing the probability of adopting improved maize seed. To increase the likelihood of adopting improved maize seed, policy makers should put more emphasis on improving rural infrastructures and providing better education.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/121065
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management in its series Staff Papers with number 121065.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: Sep 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:cudasp:121065
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Warren Hall, Ithaca NY 14853
    Fax: 607-255-9984
    Web page: http://aem.cornell.edu/

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Moser, Christine M. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2003. "The Complex Dynamics Of Smallholder Technology Adoption: The Case Of Sri In Madagascar," Working Papers 14735, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    2. Asfaw, Abay & Admassie, Assefa, 2004. "The role of education on the adoption of chemical fertiliser under different socioeconomic environments in Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 215-228, May.
    3. Kosarek, Jennifer L. & Garcia, Philip & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "Factors explaining the diffusion of hybrid maize in Latin America and the Caribbean region," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 267-280, December.
    4. Payne, Tim & Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Daberkow, Stan G., 2003. "Factors Affecting The Likelihood Of Corn Rootworm Bt Seed Adoption," 2003 Annual Meeting, July 13-16, 2003, Denver, Colorado 35983, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Sharada Weir & John Knight, 2000. "Adoption and diffusion of agricultural innovations in Ethiopia: the role of Education," CSAE Working Paper Series 2000-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Doss, Cheryl R., 2003. "Understanding Farm-Level Technology Adoption: Lessons Learned From Cimmyt'S Micro Surveys In Eastern Africa," Economics Working Papers 46552, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    7. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
    8. Howard, Julie A. & Low, Jan W. & Jeje, Jose Jaime & Boughton, Duncan & Massingue, Jaquelino & Maredia, Mywish K., 2001. "Constraints and Strategies for the Development of the Seed System in Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56045, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Hintze, L. H. & Renkow, M. & Sain, G., 2003. "Variety characteristics and maize adoption in Honduras," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 307-317, December.
    10. Nkamleu, G. B. & Adesina, A. A., 2000. "Determinants of chemical input use in peri-urban lowland systems: bivariate probit analysis in Cameroon," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 111-121, February.
    11. Hintze, L. H. & Renkow, M. & Sain, G., 2003. "Variety characteristics and maize adoption in Honduras," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 29(3), December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:cudasp:121065. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.