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Dynamics of variety change on wheat farms in Pakistan: A duration analysis

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  • Nazli, Hina
  • Smale, Melinda

Abstract

Decades after the Green Revolution, sustaining wheat productivity remains an important policy goal for the government of Pakistan. Understanding the speed of diffusion of new wheat varieties can contribute to this goal. We apply duration analysis to identify the factors that shorten the time until a farmer replaces one modern variety by another, and test hypotheses concerning two recurring themes of the Green Revolution: farm size differences and the role of information sources in seed diffusion. We find that time to adoption averages only 4years, but is shorter on larger farms. Factors that speed variety change also differ by farm size. Extension and media sources of information significantly influence adoption among larger farmers relative to information gained through social relationships, but this is not the case for marginal farmers. Traits related to consumption quality speed adoption on smaller wheat farms, where families both sell and consume their wheat; higher yields drive adoption for the most subsistence-oriented, marginal group.

Suggested Citation

  • Nazli, Hina & Smale, Melinda, 2016. "Dynamics of variety change on wheat farms in Pakistan: A duration analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 24-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:59:y:2016:i:c:p:24-33
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.12.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vaiknoras, Kate A. & Larochelle, Catherine & Birol, Ekin & Asare-Marfo, Dorene & Herrington, Caitlin, 2017. "The Roles of Formal and Informal Delivery Approaches in Achieving Fast and Sustained Adoption of Biofortified Crops: Learnings from the Iron Bean Delivery Approaches in Rwanda," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258288, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:10:p:3543-:d:173421 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Christian Crentsil & Adelina Gschwandtner & Zaki Wahhaj, 2018. "The Effects of Risk and Ambiguity Aversion on Technology Adoption: Evidence from Aquaculture in Ghana," Studies in Economics 1814, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    4. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:83:y:2019:i:c:p:271-284 is not listed on IDEAS

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