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Determinants of child nutritional status in the eastern province of Zambia: the role of improved maize varieties

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  • Julius Manda

    ()

  • Cornelis Gardebroek
  • Makaiko Khonje
  • Arega Alene
  • Munyaradzi Mutenje
  • Menale Kassie

Abstract

Using household survey data from a sample of 810 households, this paper analyses the determinants of children’s nutritional status and evaluates the impacts of improved maize varieties on child malnutrition in eastern Zambia. The paper uses an endogenous switching regression technique, combined with propensity score matching, to assess the determinants of child malnutrition and impacts of improved maize varieties on nutritional status. The study finds that child nutrition worsens with the age of the child and improves with education of household head and female household members, number of adult females in the household, and access to better sanitation. The study also finds a robust and significant impact of improved maize varieties on child malnutrition. The empirical results indicate that adoption of improved maize varieties reduces the probability of stunting by an average of about 26 %. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht and International Society for Plant Pathology 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Julius Manda & Cornelis Gardebroek & Makaiko Khonje & Arega Alene & Munyaradzi Mutenje & Menale Kassie, 2016. "Determinants of child nutritional status in the eastern province of Zambia: the role of improved maize varieties," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 239-253, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:8:y:2016:i:1:p:239-253
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-015-0541-y
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    4. Kim, Jongwoo & Mason, Nicole M. & Snapp, Sieglinde S., 2018. "Does sustainable intensification of maize production enhance child nutrition? Evidence from rural Tanzania," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273906, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Renwick, A. & Ma, W. & Nie, P. & Tang, J., 2018. "The Joint Effects of Off-farm Work and Smartphone Use on Household Income in Rural China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277304, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    7. Marenya, P. & Kassie, M. & Teklewold, H. & Erenstein, O. & Qaim, M. & Rahut, D., 2018. "Does the adoption of maize-legume cropping diversification and modern seeds affect nutritional security in Ethiopia? Evidence from panel data analysis," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277170, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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