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Reducing child malnutrition in Tanzania - combined effects of income growth and program interventions

Author

Listed:
  • Alderman, Harold
  • Hoogeveen, Hans
  • Rossi, Mariacristina

Abstract

Malnutrition is associated with an inadequate diet, poor health and sanitation services, and insufficient care for young children. A combination of income growth and nutrition interventions are therefore suggested to adequately tackle this issue, yet evidence to support this claim is often not available, especially for African settings. The authors evaluate the joint contribution of income growth and nutrition interventions toward the reduction of malnutrition. Using a four-round panel data set from northwestern Tanzania they estimate the determinants of a child's nutritional status, including household income and the presence of nutrition interventions in the community. The results show that better nutrition is associated with higher income, and that nutrition interventions have a substantial beneficial effect. Policy simulations make clear that if one intends to halve malnutrition rates by 2015 (the Millennium Development Goals objective), income growth will have to be complemented by large-scale program interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Alderman, Harold & Hoogeveen, Hans & Rossi, Mariacristina, 2005. "Reducing child malnutrition in Tanzania - combined effects of income growth and program interventions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3567, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3567
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2003. "Food Aid and Child Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1309-1324.
    2. Christiaensen, Luc & Alderman, Harold, 2004. "Child Malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can Maternal Knowledge Augment the Role of Income?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 287-312, January.
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    11. Lawrence Haddad & Harold Alderman & Simon Appleton & Lina Song & Yisehac Yohannes, 2003. "Reducing Child Malnutrition: How Far Does Income Growth Take Us?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 107-131, June.
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    Keywords

    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Early Child and Children's Health; Health Economics&Finance; Governance Indicators; Nutrition;

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