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Evaluating the Impact of Health Programmes

Listed author(s):
  • Justine Burns

    ()

    (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • Malcolm Kewsell

    ()

  • Rebecca Thornton

This paper has two broad objectives. The first objective is broadly methodological and deals with some of the more pertinent estimation issues one should be aware of when studying the impact of health status on economic outcomes. We discuss some alternatives for constructing counterfactuals when designing health program evaluations such as randomization, matching and instrumental variables. Our second objective is to present a review of the existing evidence on the impact of health interventions on individual welfare.

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File URL: http://opensaldru.uct.ac.za/bitstream/handle/11090/15/2009_40.pdf?sequence=1
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Paper provided by Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town in its series SALDRU Working Papers with number 40.

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Date of creation: Oct 2009
Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:40
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