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Supporting Communities in Transition: The Impact of the Armenian Social Investment Fund

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  • Robert S. Chase

Abstract

The Armenian Social Investment Fund supports communities' efforts to improve local infrastructure during Armenia's economic transition away from central planning, financing community-designed and -implemented projects to rehabilitate primary schools, water systems, and other infrastructure. This article considers the targeting, household impact, and community effects of the social fund's activities. It relies on a nationally representative household survey, oversampled in areas where the social fund was active. Using propensity and pipeline matching techniques to control for community self-selection into the social fund, it evaluates the household effects of rehabilitating schools and water systems. The results show that the social fund reached poor households, particularly in rural areas. Education projects increased households' spending on education significantly and had mild effects on school attendance. Potable water projects increased household access to water and had mild positive effects on health. Communities that completed a social fund project were less likely than the comparison group to complete other local infrastructure projects, suggesting that social capital was expended in these early projects. By contrast, communities that joined the social fund later and had not yet completed their projects took more initiatives not supported by the social fund. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert S. Chase, 2002. "Supporting Communities in Transition: The Impact of the Armenian Social Investment Fund," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(2), pages 219-240, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:16:y:2002:i:2:p:219-240
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    Cited by:

    1. Ravallion, Martin, 2008. "Evaluating Anti-Poverty Programs," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Justine Burns & Malcolm Kewsell & Rebecca Thornton, 2009. "Evaluating the Impact of Health Programmes," SALDRU Working Papers 40, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    3. Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2010. "Community-based development and poverty alleviation: An evaluation of China's poor village investment program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 790-799, October.
    4. Araujo, M. Caridad & Ferreira, Francisco H.G. & Lanjouw, Peter & Özler, Berk, 2008. "Local inequality and project choice: Theory and evidence from Ecuador," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1022-1046, June.
    5. Carlitz, Ruth D., 2017. "Money Flows, Water Trickles: Understanding Patterns of Decentralized Water Provision in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 16-30.
    6. Eric W. Djimeu, 2014. "Does social action fund promote schooling in conflict affected countries? Mixed evidence from Angola," HiCN Working Papers 189, Households in Conflict Network.
    7. World Bank, 2008. "Community-Driven Approaches in Lao PDR : Moving Beyond Service Delivery - Summary Overview," World Bank Other Operational Studies 6163, The World Bank.
    8. Hamid, Syed Abdul & Roberts, Jennifer & Mosley, Paul, 2011. "Evaluating the Health Effects of Micro Health Insurance Placement: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 399-411, March.
    9. Nguyen, Tu Chi & Rieger, Matthias, 2017. "Community-Driven Development and Social Capital: Evidence from Morocco," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 28-52.
    10. Subhrendu K Pattanayak, 2009. "Rough Guide to Impact Evaluation of Environmental and Development Programs," Working Papers id:2187, eSocialSciences.
    11. World Bank, 2008. "Community-Driven Approaches in Lao PDR : Moving Beyond Service Delivery, Volume 2. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7973, The World Bank.
    12. Djimeu, Eric W., 2014. "The impact of social action funds on child health in a conflict affected country: Evidence from Angola," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 35-42.

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