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The Social Impact of Social Funds in Jamaica: A 'Participatory Econometric' Analysis of Targeting, Collective Action, and Participation in Community-Driven Development

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  • Vijayendra Rao
  • Ana Maria Ibanez

Abstract

Qualitative data from a case study of the Jamaica social investment fund reveal that the social fund process is elite-driven and decision-making tends to be dominated by a small group of motivated individuals. However, there is broad-based satisfaction with the outcome. Quantitative data from 500 households mirror these findings by showing that, ex-ante, the social fund does not address the expressed needs of the majority of individuals in the majority of communities. By the completion of the project, however, 80 per cent of the community expresses satisfaction with the outcome. An analysis of the determinants of participation reveals that better educated and better networked individuals dominate the process. Propensity-score analysis demonstrates that JSIF has had a causal impact on improvements in trust and the capacity for collective action, but these gains are greater for elites.

Suggested Citation

  • Vijayendra Rao & Ana Maria Ibanez, 2005. "The Social Impact of Social Funds in Jamaica: A 'Participatory Econometric' Analysis of Targeting, Collective Action, and Participation in Community-Driven Development," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 788-838.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:41:y:2005:i:5:p:788-838
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380500145297
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pablo Ibarrarán & Miguel Sarzosa & Yuri Soares, 2008. "The Welfare Impacts of Local Investment Projects: Evidence from the Guatemala FIS," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3020, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Neha Kumar, 2007. "Pro-Poor Targeting and Participatory Governance: Evidence from Central India," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-176, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    3. Platteau, Jean-Philippe & Somville, Vincent & Wahhaj, Zaki, 2014. "Elite capture through information distortion: A theoretical essay," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 250-263.
    4. Heinrich, Carolyn J. & Lopez, Yeri, 2009. "Does Community Participation Produce Dividends in Social Investment Fund Projects?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1554-1568, September.
    5. Park, Albert & Wang, Sangui, 2010. "Community-based development and poverty alleviation: An evaluation of China's poor village investment program," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 790-799, October.
    6. Deon Filmer & Kinnon Scott, 2012. "Assessing Asset Indices," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 359-392, February.
    7. Baird, Sarah & McIntosh, Craig & Özler, Berk, 2013. "The regressive demands of demand-driven development," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 27-41.
    8. Beath, Andrew & Christia, Fotini & Enikolopov, Ruben, 2017. "Direct democracy and resource allocation: Experimental evidence from Afghanistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 199-213.
    9. Barron, Patrick & Diprose, Rachael & Woolcock, Michael, 2007. "Local conflict and development projects in Indonesia : part of the problem or part of a solution ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4212, The World Bank.
    10. Keefer, Philip, 2011. "Collective Action, Political Parties, and Pro-Development Public Policy," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(1), pages 94-118.
    11. Labonne, Julien & Chase, Robert S., 2009. "Who is at the Wheel When Communities Drive Development? Evidence from the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 219-231, January.
    12. Das, Jishnu & Das, Ranendra Kumar & Das, Veena, 2012. "The mental health gender-gap in urban India: Patterns and narratives," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1660-1672.
    13. Vecci, Joseph & Zelinsky, Tomas, 2017. "A Spatial Analysis of Foreign Aid and Civil Society," Working Papers in Economics 688, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    14. Madhulika Khanna & Nishtha Kochhar & Nethra Palaniswamy, 2015. "A Retrospective Impact Evaluation of the Tamil Nadu Empowerment and Poverty Alleviation (Pudhu Vaazhvu) Project," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(9), pages 1210-1223, September.
    15. Mogues, Tewodaj & Erman, Alvina, 2016. "Institutional arrangements to make public spending responsive to the poor—(where) have they worked?: Review of the evidence on four major intervention types," IFPRI discussion papers 1519, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. repec:eee:ecolec:v:143:y:2018:i:c:p:199-209 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Lata Gangadharan & Tarun Jain & Pushkar Maitra & Joseph Vecci, 2016. "The behavioural implications of women's empowerment programmes," WIDER Working Paper Series 064, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    18. Ivar Kolstad & Arne Wiig & Vincent Somville, 2014. "Devolutionary delusions? The effect of decentralization on corruption," CMI Working Papers 10, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    19. Janssens, Wendy, 2010. "Women's Empowerment and the Creation of Social Capital in Indian Villages," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 974-988, July.
    20. Forero, Clemente & Wills, Eduardo & Andonova, Veneta & Orozco, Luz Elena & Pardo, Oscar, 2010. "Violence, insecurity and hybrid organizational forms: A study in conflict-ridden zones in Colombia," Galeras. Working Papers Series 030, Universidad de Los Andes. Facultad de Administración. School of Management.
    21. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:343-358 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Kurosaki, Takashi & Khan, Hidayat Ullah, 2014. "Community-Based Development and Aggregate Shocks in Developing Countries: The Experience of an NGO in Pakistan," PRIMCED Discussion Paper Series 54, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    23. repec:eee:wdevel:v:106:y:2018:i:c:p:407-421 is not listed on IDEAS

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