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How responsive is body weight to transitory income changes? Evidence from rural Tanzania

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  • Bengtsson, Niklas

    () (Department of Economics)

Abstract

We use time-series of rainfall along with individual fixed effects to estimate the response of body weight to transitory changes in house-hold income and expenditure. Our data consist of a longitudinal sample of subsistence farmers in rural Tazania, representing one of the poorest populations in the world. We find that the response of body weight to transitory changes in household income is positive on average, but that the impact decreases with age and being male. For female children, a ten percent increase in household income implies an increase in body weight with about 0.4 kilo. The body weight of male adults is practically invariant to income changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Bengtsson, Niklas, 2007. "How responsive is body weight to transitory income changes? Evidence from rural Tanzania," Working Paper Series 2007:20, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2007_020
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Letta & Pierluigi Montalbano & Richard S.J. Tol, 2017. "Temperature shocks, growth and poverty thresholds: evidence from rural Tanzania," Working Papers 13/17, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    2. Lazzaroni, Sara & Wagner, Natascha, 2016. "Misfortunes never come singly: Structural change, multiple shocks and child malnutrition in rural Senegal," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 246-262.
    3. Gajigo, Ousman & Schwab, Benjamin, 2012. "The Rhythm of the Rains: Seasonal Effects on Child Health in The Gambia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126343, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Francesca MARCHETTA & David SAHN & Luca TIBERTI, 2018. "School or work? The role of weather shocks in Madagascar," Working Papers 201803, CERDI.
    5. Bandara, Amarakoon & Dehejia, Rajeev & Lavie-Rouse, Shaheen, 2015. "The Impact of Income and Non-Income Shocks on Child Labor: Evidence from a Panel Survey of Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 218-237.
    6. Lovo, Stefania & Veronesi, Marcella, 2014. "Crop Diversification and Child Health: Empirical Evidence From Tanzania," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182735, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Sonya Krutikova & Helene Bie Lilleør, 2015. "Fetal Origins of Personality: Effects of early life circumstances on adult personality traits," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    8. Ohlsson, Henry, 2011. "The legacy of the Swedish gift and inheritance tax, 1884–2004," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(03), pages 539-569, December.
    9. Jean-Francois Maystadt & Gilles Duranton, 2014. "The development push of refugees," Working Papers 66910685, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    10. Mariano Rabassa & Emmanuel Skoufias & Hanan Jacoby, 2014. "Weather and Child Health in Rural Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 23(4), pages 464-492.
    11. Dietrich, Stephan & Malerba, Daniele & Barrientos, Armando & Gassmann, Franziska & Mohnen, Pierre & Tirivayi, Nyasha & Kavuma, Susan & Matovu, Fred, 2017. "Social protection investments, human capital, and income growth: Simulating the returns to social cash transfers in Uganda," MERIT Working Papers 029, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. Ronald Mendoza & Nicholas Rees, 2009. "Infant Mortality During Economic Downturns and Recovery," Working papers 0904, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    13. Fichera, Eleonora & Savage, David, 2015. "Income and Health in Tanzania. An Instrumental Variable Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 500-515.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income variability; Consumption; Nutrition; sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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