IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/iaae12/126747.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender and Institutional Dimensions of Agricultural Technology Adoption: A Review of Literature and Synthesis of 35 Case Studies

Author

Listed:
  • Ragasa, Catherine

Abstract

This paper reviews and integrates findings from existing empirical studies and case studies received from 35 organizations in various countries to identify demand- and supply-side constraints and opportunities in access, adoption and impact of technological innovations. This review consistently finds that women have much slower observed rates of adoption of a wide range of technologies than men; and these are mainly due to differentiated access to complementary inputs and services. There are limited studies that looked at upstream stages including priority-setting and innovation processes, in which women continue to be underrepresented.

Suggested Citation

  • Ragasa, Catherine, 2012. "Gender and Institutional Dimensions of Agricultural Technology Adoption: A Review of Literature and Synthesis of 35 Case Studies," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126747, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126747
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126747
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stads, Gert-Jan & Beintema, Nienke M., 2009. "Public agricultural research in Latin America and the Caribbean: Investment and capacity trends:," ASTI Synthesis Report 27261, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Peterman, Amber & Behrman, Julia & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IFPRI discussion papers 975, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Marie Godquin & Agnes R. Quisumbing, 2008. "Separate but equal? The gendered nature of social capital in rural Philippine communities," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 13-33.
    4. Meinzen-Dick, R., 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IWMI Working Papers H043604, International Water Management Institute.
      • Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Biermayr-Jenzano, Patricia & Wilde, Vicki & Noordeloos, Marco & Ragasa, Catherine & Beintema, Nienke, 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IFPRI discussion papers 973, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Sara Horrell & Pramila Krishnan, 2007. "Poverty and productivity in female-headed households in Zimbabwe," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(8), pages 1351-1380.
    6. Westermann, Olaf & Ashby, Jacqueline & Pretty, Jules, 2005. "Gender and social capital: The importance of gender differences for the maturity and effectiveness of natural resource management groups," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1783-1799, November.
    7. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1996. "Male-female differences in agricultural productivity: Methodological issues and empirical evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(10), pages 1579-1595, October.
    8. Shoba Arun & Thankom Arun, 2002. "ICTs, gender and development: women in software production in Kerala," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 39-50.
    9. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, P. B. R. & Reardon, Thomas, 2002. "Strategies for stimulating poverty-alleviating growth in the rural nonfarm economy in developing countries:," EPTD discussion papers 92, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations? The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
    11. Léandre BASSOLE & Jean-Louis ARCAND, 2006. "Does Community Driven Development Work? Evidence from Senegal," Working Papers 200606, CERDI.
    12. Ragasa, Catherine & Kinwa-Muzinga, Annie & Ulimwengu, John M., 2012. "Gender assessment of the agricultural sector in the Democratic Republic of the Congo:," IFPRI discussion papers 1201, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Liangzhi You & Michael Johnson, 2010. "Exploring strategic priorities for regional agricultural R&D investments in East and Central Africa," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 177-190, March.
    14. Smale, Melinda & Heisey, Paul W., 1994. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 10(1), pages 95-99, January.
    15. C. Mark Blackden & Quentin Wodon, 2006. "Gender, Time Use, and Poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7214.
    16. Richard Bennett & Stephen Morse & Yousouf Ismael, 2006. "The economic impact of genetically modified cotton on South African smallholders: Yield, profit and health effects," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 662-677.
    17. Maren Duvendack & Richard Palmer-Jones, 2012. "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations: Re-investigating the Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(12), pages 1864-1880, December.
    18. Doss, Cheryl R. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption Of Maize And Wheat Technologies In Eastern Africa: A Synthesis Of The Findings Of 22 Case Studies," Economics Working Papers 46522, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    19. Markus Goldstein & Christopher Udry, 2008. "The Profits of Power: Land Rights and Agricultural Investment in Ghana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(6), pages 981-1022, December.
    20. Dean S. Karlan & Jonathan Zinman, 2008. "Credit Elasticities in Less-Developed Economies: Implications for Microfinance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 1040-1068, June.
    21. Gert-Jan Stads & Nienke M. Beintema, 2009. "Public Agricultural Research in Latin America and the Caribbean: Investment and Capacity Trends," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 33378, Inter-American Development Bank.
    22. Peterman, A., 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IWMI Working Papers H043605, International Water Management Institute.
    23. Davis, Kristin & Negash, Martha, 2007. "Gender, wealth, and participation in community groups in Meru Central District, Kenya:," CAPRi working papers 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    24. Deininger, Klaus & Ali, Daniel Ayalew & Holden, Stein & Zevenbergen, Jaap, 2008. "Rural Land Certification in Ethiopia: Process, Initial Impact, and Implications for Other African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1786-1812, October.
    25. Blackden, Mark & Wodon, Quentin, 2006. "Gender, Time Use, and Poverty: Introduction," MPRA Paper 11080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. Florent Kinkingninhoun-Mêdagbé & Aliou Diagne & Franklin Simtowe & Afiavi Agboh-Noameshie & Patrice Adégbola, 2010. "Gender discrimination and its impact on income, productivity, and technical efficiency: evidence from Benin," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 27(1), pages 57-69, March.
    27. Robert Jensen, 2007. "The Digital Provide: Information (Technology), Market Performance, and Welfare in the South Indian Fisheries Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 879-924.
    28. Joseph P. Kaboski & Robert M. Townsend, 2005. "Policies and Impact: An Analysis of Village-Level Microfinance Institutions," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-50, March.
    29. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(2), pages 141-153, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Florence Kondylis & Valerie Mueller & S. Zhu, 2015. "Measuring agricultural knowledge and adoption," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(3), pages 449-462, May.
    2. Acheampong, Patricia P. & Bonsu, Patterson O. & Omae, Hide & Nagumo, Fujio, 2016. "Disadoption of Improved Agronomic practices in Cowpea and Maize at Ejura-Sekyeredumase and Atebubu-Amantin Districts in Ghana," Sustainable Agriculture Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 5(3).
    3. Tuan M. Ha & Ockie J. H. Bosch & Nam C. Nguyen, 2016. "Establishing an Evolutionary Learning Laboratory for Improving the Quality of Life of Vietnamese Women in Small-scale Agriculture: Part II – Systemic Interventions," Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(3), pages 341-359, May.
    4. Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma & Thelma, Antony, 2016. "Improved Agricultural Technology Adoption in Zambia: Are Women Farmers Being Left Behind?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245916, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
    6. Tuan M. Ha & Ockie J. H. Bosch & Nam C. Nguyen, 2016. "Establishing an Evolutionary Learning Laboratory for Improving the Quality of Life of Vietnamese Women in Small-scale Agriculture: Part I—The Current Situation," Systems Research and Behavioral Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(4), pages 532-543, July.
    7. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:30:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_s41287-017-0118-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Nielsen, Thea & Schunemann, Franziska & McNulty, Emily & Zeller, Manfred & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Kato, Edward & Meyer, Stefan & Anderson, Weston & Zhu, Tingju & Queface, Antonio & Mapemba, Lawrence, 2015. "The food-energy-water security nexus: Definitions, policies, and methods in an application to Malawi and Mozambique:," IFPRI discussion papers 1480, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie, 2012. "Seeing is Believing? Evidence from a Demonstration Plot Experiment in Mozambique:," MSSP working papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; technology adoption; innovation; agricultural extension; research; institutions; Agribusiness;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126747. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.