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Perceptions Of Enhanced Freshness Formulation Technologies And Adoption Decisions Among Smallholder Banana Farmers In Morogoro, Tanzania

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  • Subert, Moses Peter

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  • Subert, Moses Peter, 2017. "Perceptions Of Enhanced Freshness Formulation Technologies And Adoption Decisions Among Smallholder Banana Farmers In Morogoro, Tanzania," Research Theses 276437, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cmpart:276437
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/276437/files/Final_Compiled_MSc.Thesis_Moses_%20Peter_Subert%20Full_10_November%20final%20submision.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas Reardon & Kostas Stamoulis & Prabhu Pingali, 2007. "Rural nonfarm employment in developing countries in an era of globalization," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 173-183, December.
    2. Nassul S. Kabunga & Thomas Dubois & Matin Qaim, 2012. "Yield Effects of Tissue Culture Bananas in Kenya: Accounting for Selection Bias and the Role of Complementary Inputs," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 444-464, June.
    3. Doss, Cheryl R. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption Of Maize And Wheat Technologies In Eastern Africa: A Synthesis Of The Findings Of 22 Case Studies," Economics Working Papers 46522, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    4. Thapa, Sridhar, 2008. "Gender differentials in agricultural productivity: evidence from Nepalese household data," MPRA Paper 13722, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2009.
    5. World Bank, 2010. "Gender and Governance in Rural Services : Insights from India, Ghana, and Ethiopia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2410.
    6. Lauren Pandolfelli & Ruth Meinzen-Dick & Stephan Dohrn, 2008. "Gender and collective action: motivations, effectiveness and impact," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 1-11.
    7. Phiri, Donald & Franzel, Steven & Mafongoya, Paramu & Jere, Isaac & Katanga, Roza & Phiri, Stanslous, 2004. "Who is using the new technology? The association of wealth status and gender with the planting of improved tree fallows in Eastern Province, Zambia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 131-144, February.
    8. Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "Twenty-Five Years Of Research On Women Farmers In Africa: Lessons And Implications For Agricultural Research Institutions; With An Annotated Bibliography," Economics Program Papers 23720, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    9. Ndiritu, S. Wagura & Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele, 2014. "Are there systematic gender differences in the adoption of sustainable agricultural intensification practices? Evidence from Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 117-127.
    10. Ezumah, Nkoli N. & Di Domenico, Catherine M., 1995. "Enhancing the role of women in crop production: A case study of Igbo women in Nigeria," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 1731-1744, October.
    11. Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Shiferaw, Bekele & Mmbando, Frank & Mekuria, Mulugetta, 2013. "Adoption of interrelated sustainable agricultural practices in smallholder systems: Evidence from rural Tanzania," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 525-540.
    12. Salvatore di Falco & Erwin Bulte, 2011. "A Dark Side of Social Capital? Kinship, Consumption, and Savings," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(8), pages 1128-1151, June.
    13. Kirui, Oliver K., 2013. "Drivers of Collective Action and the Welfare Gains of such Initiatives among smallholder farmers: Experiences from Kenya," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161619, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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