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Gender, wealth, and participation in community groups in Meru Central District, Kenya:

Author

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  • Davis, Kristin
  • Negash, Martha

Abstract

"TA mixed-methods, multiple-stage approach was used to obtain data on how gender and wealth affected participation in community groups in Meru, Kenya, and how men and women farmers obtain and diffuse agricultural information. Research techniques included participant observation, documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews, social mapping, group timelines, and structured questionnaires. Dairy-goat farmer groups were interviewed for the study. Qualitative data provided baseline information, and helped in the formulation of research questions. Quantitative data were analyzed using contingency tables, descriptive statistics, correlations, tests of significance, and regression. Factors that affected participation in different types of groups included household composition, age, and gender. Women made up 59 percent of the dairy-goat group (DGG) members, with the DGG project encouraging women's participation. Women made up 76 percent of DGG treasurer positions; 43 percent of secretary positions, and 30 percent of chairperson positions. Gender also influenced participation in clan groups, water groups, and merry-go-round (savings and loans) groups. Wealth did not appear to have a significant effect on participation in community groups. Extension was the most important information source for both men and women farmers. However, church and indigenous knowledge (passed on from parents) seemed more important to women. Both men and women mentioned other farmers, groups, and “baraza” (public meetings used to make announcements and diffuse information) as important information sources, but they rated them at different levels of importance. Men were diffusing information to greater numbers of people than women, although men and women diffused to similar sources. This study shows that because men and women traditionally participate in different types of groups and receive agricultural information from different sources, development agencies must target different types of groups and institutions to reach men, women, or poor farmers. Mechanisms should be developed to include women, the poor, and other targeted groups in community associations that provide market and other income-earning opportunities.." Author's Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, Kristin & Negash, Martha, 2007. "Gender, wealth, and participation in community groups in Meru Central District, Kenya:," CAPRi working papers 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:worpps:65
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Place, Frank & Kariuki, Gatarwa & Wangila, Justine & Kristjanson, Patti & Makauki, Adolf & Ndubi, Jessica, 2002. "Assessing the factors underlying differences in group performance: methodological issues and empirical findings from the highlands of Central Kenya," CAPRi working papers 25, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Agrawal, Arun & Yadama, Gautam & Andrade, Raul & Bhattacharya, Ajoy, 2006. "Decentralization and environmental conservation: gender effects from participation in joint forest management," CAPRi working papers 53, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Enid Katungi & Svetlana Edmeades & Melinda Smale, 2008. "Gender, social capital and information exchange in rural Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 35-52.
    4. Kariuki, Gatarwa & Place, Frank, 2005. "Initiatives for rural development through collective action: the case of household participation in group activities in the highlands of Central Kenya," CAPRi working papers 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Godquin, Marie & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2006. "Groups, networks, and social capital in the Philippine communities:," CAPRi working papers 55, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Peterman, A., 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IWMI Working Papers H043605, International Water Management Institute.
    2. Meinzen-Dick, R., 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IWMI Working Papers H043604, International Water Management Institute.
      • Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Biermayr-Jenzano, Patricia & Wilde, Vicki & Noordeloos, Marco & Ragasa, Catherine & Beintema, Nienke, 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IFPRI discussion papers 973, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Ragasa, Catherine, 2012. "Gender and Institutional Dimensions of Agricultural Technology Adoption: A Review of Literature and Synthesis of 35 Case Studies," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126747, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Salazar, César A. & Jaime, Mónica M., 2009. "Participación en Organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil en Chile. ¿Una Alternativa para Mejorar el Bienestar Económico?
      [Participation in Civil Society Organizations in Chile. Is it an Alternative to
      ," MPRA Paper 12797, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Peterman, Amber & Behrman, Julia & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IFPRI discussion papers 975, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Salazar, César A. & Jaime, Mónica M., 2009. "¿Qué influye en la decisión individual de participar? Un enfoque microeconómico del capital social para el caso de las organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil en Chile
      [What influence the individual de
      ," MPRA Paper 12795, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Keywords

    Gender; Collective action;

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