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Men's Crops? Women's Crops? The Gender Patterns of Cropping in Ghana

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  • Doss, Cheryl R.

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  • Doss, Cheryl R., 2002. "Men's Crops? Women's Crops? The Gender Patterns of Cropping in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 1987-2000, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:30:y:2002:i:11:p:1987-2000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 7(2), July.
    2. Rogers, Beatrice Lorge, 1995. "Alternative definitions of female headship in the Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(12), pages 2033-2039, December.
    3. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations?: The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 27-39, June.
    4. von Braun, Joachim & Webb, Patrick J R, 1989. "The Impact of New Crop Technology on the Agricultural Division of Labor in a West African Setting," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(3), pages 513-534, April.
    5. Ezumah, Nkoli N. & Di Domenico, Catherine M., 1995. "Enhancing the role of women in crop production: A case study of Igbo women in Nigeria," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 1731-1744, October.
    6. Gladwin, Christina H., 1992. "Gendered impacts of fertilizer subsidy removal programs in Malawi and Cameroon," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 7(2), pages 141-153, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Katia Alejandra Covarrubias, 2015. "The role of crop diversity in household production and food security in Uganda: A gender-differentiated analysis," FOODSECURE Working papers 32, LEI Wageningen UR.
    2. Carr, Edward R., 2008. "Men's Crops and Women's Crops: The Importance of Gender to the Understanding of Agricultural and Development Outcomes in Ghana's Central Region," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 900-915, May.
    3. Ann Ferrell, 2012. "Doing masculinity: gendered challenges to replacing burley tobacco in central Kentucky," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(2), pages 137-149, June.
    4. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Kumar, Neha & Behrman, Julia A., 2011. "Do shocks affect men's and women's assets differently?: A review of literature and new evidence from Bangladesh and Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Dzanku, Fred M., 2015. "Household-specific food price differentials and high-value crop production in rural Ghana," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 73-82.
    6. Doss, Cheryl R. & Morris, Michael L., 2001. "How does gender affect the adoption of agricultural innovations? The case of improved maize technology in Ghana," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(1), June.
    7. Anderson, C. Leigh & Reynolds, Travis W. & Gugerty, Mary Kay, 2017. "Husband and Wife Perspectives on Farm Household Decision-making Authority and Evidence on Intra-household Accord in Rural Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 169-183.
    8. La Ferrara, Eliana, 2007. "Descent rules and strategic transfers. Evidence from matrilineal groups in Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 280-301, July.
    9. Filipski, Mateusz & Aboudrare, Abdellah & Lybbert, Travis J. & Taylor, J. Edward, 2017. "Spice Price Spikes: Simulating Impacts of Saffron Price Volatility in a Gendered Local Economy-Wide Model," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 84-99.
    10. Lambrecht, Isabel Brigitte, 2016. "“As a Husband I Will Love, Lead, and Provide.” Gendered Access to Land in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 188-200.
    11. Behrman, Julia & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2011. "The gender implications of large-scale land deals:," IFPRI discussion papers 1056, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie & Sheriff, Glenn & Zhu, Siyao, 2016. "Do Female Instructors Reduce Gender Bias in Diffusion of Sustainable Land Management Techniques? Experimental Evidence From Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 436-449.
    13. Malapit, Hazel Jean L. & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2015. "What dimensions of women’s empowerment in agriculture matter for nutrition in Ghana?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 54-63.
    14. Meinzen-Dick, R., 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IWMI Working Papers H043604, International Water Management Institute.
      • Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Biermayr-Jenzano, Patricia & Wilde, Vicki & Noordeloos, Marco & Ragasa, Catherine & Beintema, Nienke, 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IFPRI discussion papers 973, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
    16. Peterman, Amber & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Nkonya, Ephraim, 2010. "Understanding gender differences in agricultural productivity in Uganda and Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1003, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    17. Maredia, Mywish K., 2011. "Curriculum Enhancement and Reform to Meet the Needs of Smallholder Farmers in Developing Countries: Survey of Literature," Staff Papers 105395, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    18. Maria Christie & Emily Houweling & Laura Zseleczky, 2015. "Mapping gendered pest management knowledge, practices, and pesticide exposure pathways in Ghana and Mali," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(4), pages 761-775, December.
    19. repec:bla:sajeco:v:85:y:2017:i:1:p:98-122 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Orr, Alastair & Tsusaka, Taku & Kee-Tui, Sabine & Msere, Harry, 2015. "What do we mean by 'women's crops'? Commercialisation, gender, and the power to name," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212600, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    21. Bhattarai, Basundhara & Beilin, Ruth & Ford, Rebecca, 2015. "Gender, Agrobiodiversity, and Climate Change: A Study of Adaptation Practices in the Nepal Himalayas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 122-132.

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