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Does female income share influence household expenditures? Evidence from the Côte d'Ivoire

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  • John Hoddinott
  • Lawrence Haddad

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Suggested Citation

  • John Hoddinott & Lawrence Haddad, 1994. "Does female income share influence household expenditures? Evidence from the Côte d'Ivoire," CSAE Working Paper Series 1994-17, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:1994-17
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    Cited by:

    1. Grossbard, Shoshana, 2010. "How “Chicagoan” Are Gary Becker’S Economic Models Of Marriage?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 377-395, September.
    2. Olivier Dagnelie & Philippe Lemay‐Boucher, 2012. "Rosca Participation in Benin: A Commitment Issue," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 74(2), pages 235-252, April.
    3. Dillon, Andrew & Quiñones, Esteban J., 2010. "Asset dynamics in Northern Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1049, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Jonathan Robinson, 2012. "Limited Insurance within the Household: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 140-164, October.
    5. Theodore C Bergstrom, 2003. "An Evolutionary View of Family Conflict and Cooperation," Levine's Bibliography 506439000000000443, UCLA Department of Economics.
    6. Parra Osorio, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Gender, Time Use, and Labor Income in Guinea: Micro and Macro Analyses," MPRA Paper 28465, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Haddad, Lawrence, 1999. "The income earned by women: impacts on welfare outcomes," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 135-141, March.
    8. Jungmin Lee & Mark L. Pocock, 2007. "Intrahousehold allocation of financial resources: evidence from South Korean individual bank accounts," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 41-58, March.
    9. Karen Macours & Norbert Schady & Renos Vakis, 2012. "Cash Transfers, Behavioral Changes, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 247-273, April.
    10. Swaminathan, Hema & Findeis, Jill L., 2003. "Impact Of Credit On Labor Allocation And Consumption Patterns In Malawi," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22118, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Behrman, Jere R. & Hoddinott, John, 2001. "An evaluation of the impact of PROGRESA on pre-school child height," FCND briefs 104, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Haddad, Lawrence James & Peña, Christine & Nishida, Chizuru & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Slack, Alison T., 1996. "Food security and nutrition implications of intrahousehold bias," FCND discussion papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Anuradha Seth, 1998. "Intra-Household Consumption Patterns: Issues, Evidence and Implications for Human Development," Human Development Occasional Papers (1992-2007) HDOCPA-1998-18, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    14. Hoffmann, Vivian, 2008. "Psychology, Gender, and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Free and Purchased Mosquito Nets," Working Papers 55282, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    15. Levison Stanley Chiwaula & Ben M. Kaluwa, 2008. "Household consumption of infant foods in two low-income districts in Malawi," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(5), pages 686-697.
    16. Aromolaran, Adebayo B., 2009. "Does Increase in Women's Income Relative to Men's Income Increase Food calorie Intake in Poor Households? Evidence from Nigeria," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51374, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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