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Spillover effects of targeted subsidies: An assessment of fertilizer and improved seed use in Nigeria

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  • Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda
  • Salau, Sheu

Abstract

While there is growing evidence of the impact of targeted subsidies on private input demand, as far as we are aware no empirical studies have examined the spillover effects of targeted subsidies for just one input on the use of other complementary inputs with which there is low substitutability. Consequently, this study begins to fill this gap by exploring the effect of increasing access to subsidized fertilizer on farmers’ use of improved seed in Nigeria.

Suggested Citation

  • Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda & Salau, Sheu, 2013. "Spillover effects of targeted subsidies: An assessment of fertilizer and improved seed use in Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers 1260, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1260
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Thomas S. Jayne & Ephraim Chirwa, 2010. "Subsidies and Crowding Out: A Double-Hurdle Model of Fertilizer Demand in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 26-42.
    2. Lenis Saweda O. Liverpool-Tasie & Alex Winter-Nelson, 2012. "Social Learning and Farm Technology in Ethiopia: Impacts by Technology, Network Type, and Poverty Status," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1505-1521, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2014. "Understanding the agricultural input landscape in Sub-Saharan Africa : recent plot, household, and community-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7014, The World Bank.
    2. Jayne, T.S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2016. "Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs in Africa: An Assessment of Recent Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 245892, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Houssou, Nazaire & Andam, Kwaw S. & Collins, Asante-Addo, 2017. "Can better targeting improve the effectiveness of Ghana's Fertilizer Subsidy Program? Lessons from Ghana and other countries in Africa south of the Sahara," IFPRI discussion papers 1605, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Murathi Kiratu, Nixon, 2014. "An Assessment of the Impact of Kilimo Plus Subsidy Program on Smallholder Farmers' Food Security and Income in Nakuru North District, Kenya," Research Theses 243470, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural inputs; voucher program; improved seed; improved seed adoption; fertilizer use; subsidies; fertilizer subsidies; Spillover;

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