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The Economics of Soil Fertility Management in Malawi

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  • Johannes Sauer
  • Hardwick Tchale

Abstract

We estimated a normalized translog yield-response model using African farm-household survey data to compare the yield of smallholder maize production under integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) and chemical-based soil fertility management. Controlling for other factors, maize yield responses were higher under ISFM. Results suggest ISFM practices would significantly improve the profitability of smallholder maize production, especially under escalating fertilizer prices. Copyright 2009 Agricultural and Applied Economics Association

Suggested Citation

  • Johannes Sauer & Hardwick Tchale, 2009. "The Economics of Soil Fertility Management in Malawi," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 31(3), pages 535-560, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:535-560
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    1. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:75:y:2018:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, T.S., 2013. "Are Kenyan farmers under-utilizing fertilizer? Implications for input intensification strategies and research," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 39-52.
    3. Kilic, Talip & Palacios-López, Amparo & Goldstein, Markus, 2015. "Caught in a Productivity Trap: A Distributional Perspective on Gender Differences in Malawian Agriculture," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 416-463.
    4. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Are Farmers Under-Utilizing Fertilizer? Evidence from Kenya," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126739, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Jayne, T.S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2016. "Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs in Africa: An Assessment of Recent Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 245892, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Kamau, Mercy W. & Smale, Melinda & Mutua, Mercy, 2013. "Farmer Demand for Soil Fertility Management Practices in Kenya’s Grain Basket," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150722, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis, 2015. "Is fertilizer use really suboptimnal in sub-Saharan Africa? The case of rice in Nigeria," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212053, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Koppmair, Stefan & Kassie, Menale & Qaim, Matin, 2016. "Farm input subsidies and the adoption of natural resource management technologies," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235313, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "What is the Scope for Increased Fertilizer Use in Kenya?," Food Security International Development Working Papers 135283, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda O. & Omonona, Bolarin T. & Sanou, Awa & Ogunleye, Wale, 2015. "Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use in Sub-Saharan Africa a profitable proposition ? evidence from Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7201, The World Bank.

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