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Farmer Demand for Soil Fertility Management Practices in Kenya’s Grain Basket

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  • Kamau, Mercy W.
  • Smale, Melinda
  • Mutua, Mercy

Abstract

Land degradation cripples smallholder crop production in Sub-Saharan Africa, including those found in the densely populated, grain basket areas of Kenya. Research in the early nineties already documented and rated nutrient depletion to be very high in the east African Highlands. Whereas some of the soil related problems are inherent, smallholder farmer practices have contributed to the degradation, including the increasing soil nutrient depletion.

Suggested Citation

  • Kamau, Mercy W. & Smale, Melinda & Mutua, Mercy, 2013. "Farmer Demand for Soil Fertility Management Practices in Kenya’s Grain Basket," Food Security International Development Working Papers 161373, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:161373
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/161373
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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