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Allocation and Valuation of Smallholder Maize Residues in Western Kenya

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  • Berazneva, Julia
  • Lee, David R.
  • Place, Frank
  • Jakubson, George

Abstract

Crop residues, one of smallholder farmers' most common but overlooked resources, serve multiple purposes in many rural households: they are a source of fuel, animal feed, and soil amendments. They are key to maintaining soil fertility, depletion of which is widely considered to be one of the major causes of low food production in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using household survey data from western Kenya, we investigate the contribution of maize residues to smallholders' agricultural production and estimate their shadow value to be 5.94 Kenyan shillings (US$0.07) per kilogram. Valuing crop residue benefits contributes to multiple social goals, including improved economic evaluation of alternative agricultural practices and environmental conservation efforts.

Suggested Citation

  • Berazneva, Julia & Lee, David R. & Place, Frank & Jakubson, George, 2018. "Allocation and Valuation of Smallholder Maize Residues in Western Kenya," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 172-182.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:152:y:2018:i:c:p:172-182
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2018.05.024
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural Resource Valuation; Crop Residues; Sustainable Agriculture; Environmental Goods; Western Kenya;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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