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Do Input Subsidy Programs Raise Incomes and Reduce Poverty among Smallholder Farm Households? Evidence from Zambia

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  • Mason, Nicole M.
  • Tembo, Solomon T.

Abstract

Many of the agricultural input subsidy programs (ISPs) currently being implemented in Sub-Saharan Africa include among their objectives raising farm incomes and reducing rural poverty. However, there is a dearth of empirical evidence on the extent to which ISPs are achieving these objectives. Moreover, results from previous studies on ISPs in Zambia and Malawi, and stubbornly high rural poverty rates in both countries despite many years of large-scale ISPs, have raised doubts that ISPs are effectively reducing poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Mason, Nicole M. & Tembo, Solomon T., 2015. "Do Input Subsidy Programs Raise Incomes and Reduce Poverty among Smallholder Farm Households? Evidence from Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 198702, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:198702
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/198702/files/wp92.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Bwalya, Richard & Kamwanga, Jolly & Wamulume, Mukata, 2012. "Assessing the Feasibility of Implementing the Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP) Through an Electronic Voucher System in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 123210, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Ricker-Gilbert, Jacob & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Do Fertilizer Subsidies Boost Staple Crop Production and Reduce Poverty Across the Distribution of Smallholders in Africa? Quantile Regression Results from Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126742, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Nicole M. Mason & Francis A. Darko & Solomon T. Tembo, 2013. "What are the effects of input subsidy programs on maize prices? Evidence from Malawi and Zambia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 671-686, November.
    4. Chirwa, Themba G., 2010. "Program evaluation of agricultural input subsidies in Malawi using treatment effects: Methods and practicability based on propensity scores," MPRA Paper 20878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    6. Nicole M. Mason & Melinda Smale, 2013. "Impacts of subsidized hybrid seed on indicators of economic well-being among smallholder maize growers in Zambia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 659-670, November.
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    18. Nicole M. Mason & T.S. Jayne & Rhoda Mofya-Mukuka, 2013. "Zambia's input subsidy programs," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 613-628, November.
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    1. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:75:y:2018:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mason, Nicole M. & Wineman, Ayala & Kirimi, Lilian & Mather, David, 2016. "The Effects of Kenya’s ‘Smarter’ Input Subsidy Program on Smallholder Behavior and Incomes: Do Different Quasi-Experimental Approaches Lead to the Same Conclusions?," Working Papers 233674, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    3. Mason, Nicole M. & Wineman, Ayala & Kirimi, Lilian & Mather, David, 2015. "The effects of Kenya’s ‘smarter’ input subsidy," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 232093, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Jayne, T.S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Ariga, Joshua, 2016. "Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs In Africa: An Assessment Of Recent Evidence," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259509, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    5. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole M., 2016. "What drives input subsidy policy reform? The case of Zambia, 2002–2016," IFPRI discussion papers 1572, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Mari Kangasniemi & Helen Barnes & Gemma Wright & Michell Mpike, 2015. "Tax-benefit microsimulation modelling in Zambia: A feasibility study," WIDER Working Paper Series 121, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Fung, Winnie & Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Mason, Nicole & Oyelere, Ruth, 2015. "Can Crop Purchase Programs Reduce Poverty and Improve Welfare in Rural Communities? Evidence from the Food Reserve Agency in Zambia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211637, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole, 2016. "What Drives Input Subsidy Policy Reform? The Case Of Zambia, 2002-2016," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 246951, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Security and Poverty;

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