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Student Outcomes in Philippine Elementary Schools: An Evaluation of Four Experiments

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  • Tan, Jee-Peng
  • Lane, Julia
  • Lassibille, Gerard

Abstract

Policymakers in most developing countries are concerned about high dropout rates and poor student learning in primary education. The government of the Philippines initiated the Dropout Intervention Program in 1990-92 as part of its effort to address these issues. Under this program, four experimental interventions were randomly assigned to 20 schools in selected low-income areas. Pre- and post-intervention data were collected from these schools, as well as from 10 control schools, in order to evaluate the program's impact on dropout behavior and student learning. The economic justification for replication appears to be strongest for the interventions that provided teachers with learning materials, which helped them to pace lessons according to students' differing abilities, and that initiated parent-teacher partnerships, which involved parents in the schooling of their children. The justification was weakest for the school feeding intervention. In addition to the results specific to the Philippines, this research demonstrates the feasibility of monitoring and evaluating interventions in the education sector in other developing countries, including the use of randomized control designs. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Tan, Jee-Peng & Lane, Julia & Lassibille, Gerard, 1999. "Student Outcomes in Philippine Elementary Schools: An Evaluation of Four Experiments," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(3), pages 493-508, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:493-508
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    Cited by:

    1. Glewwe, Paul, 2001. "Schools, Skills And Economic Development: Education Policies, Student Learning And Socioeconomic Outcomes In Developing Countries," Bulletins 12969, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
    2. Kuecken, Maria & Valfort, Marie-Anne, 2013. "When do textbooks matter for achievement? Evidence from African primary schools," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 119(3), pages 311-315.
    3. repec:rce:rvceco:28926 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Paul W. Glewwe & Eric A. Hanushek & Sarah D. Humpage & Renato Ravina, 2011. "School Resources and Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Review of the Literature from 1990 to 2010," NBER Working Papers 17554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie & Zhu, Jessica, 2017. "Seeing is believing? Evidence from an extension network experiment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 1-20.
    6. Marco Sanfilippo & Bruno Martorano & Chris De Neubourg, 2012. "The Impact of Social Protection on Children: A review of the literature," Papers inwopa666, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. World Bank, 2008. "World Development Report 2007 Development and the Next Generation," Working Papers id:1755, eSocialSciences.
    8. Abdoulaye Diagne & Mouhamadou Moustapha Lô & Ousmane Sokhna & Fatoumata L. Diallo, 2013. "Evaluation of the Impact of School Canteen Programs on Internal Efficiency of Schools, Cognitive Acquisitions and Learning Capacities of Students in Rural Primary Schools in Senegal," Working Papers PIERI 2013-14, PEP-PIERI.
    9. Vermeersch, Christel & Kremer, Michael, 2005. "Schools meals, educational achievement and school competition: evidence from a randomized evaluation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3523, The World Bank.
    10. World Bank, 2002. "Brazil : Growth and Poverty Reduction in Pernambuco," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15444, The World Bank.

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