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World Development Report 2007 Development and the Next Generation

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Abstract

The Report examines five pivotal phases of life that can help unleash the development of young people’s potential with the right government policies: learning, working, staying healthy, forming families, and exercising citizenship. Within each of these transitions, governments need not only to increase investments directly but also to cultivate an environment for young people and their families to invest in themselves. The Report identifi es three policy directions for helping youth develop themselves and contribute to society: expanding opportunities, enhancing capabilities, and providing second chances.

Suggested Citation

  • World Bank, 2008. "World Development Report 2007 Development and the Next Generation," Working Papers id:1755, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1755
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=Document111112008330.4272882.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=1755&fref=repec
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cardoza, Guillermo & Fornes, Gaston & Farber, Vanina & Gonzalez Duarte, Roberto & Ruiz Gutierrez, Jaime, 2016. "Barriers and public policies affecting the international expansion of Latin American SMEs: Evidence from Brazil, Colombia, and Peru," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 2030-2039.
    2. Chankrajang, Thanyaporn, 2012. "The Effects of Rural Land Right Security on Labour Structural Transformation and Urbanization: Evidence from Thailand," WIDER Working Paper Series 041, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Francisco J. Fernández & Roberto D. Ponce & Maria Blanco & Diego Rivera & Felipe Vásquez, 2016. "Water Variability and the Economic Impacts on Small-Scale Farmers. A Farm Risk-Based Integrated Modelling Approach," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 30(4), pages 1357-1373, March.
    4. Sloan, Sean, 2015. "The development-driven forest transition and its utility for REDD+," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 1-11.
    5. Catherine Guirkinger & Jean-Philippe Platteau, 2014. "The Effect of Land Scarcity on Farm Structure: Empirical Evidence from Mali," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(2), pages 195-238.
    6. Alia El Mahdi, 2010. "Poverty and Informality: A Restraining or Constructive Relationship?," Working Papers 569, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 Jan 2010.
    7. Wouter Beekman & Gert Jan Veldwisch, 2016. "Supporting Farmer-Led Irrigation in Mozambique: Reflections on Field-Testing a New Design Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(6), pages 1-16, June.
    8. Evan Borkum & Anitha Sivasankaran & Jane Fortson & Kristen Velyvis & Christopher Ksoll & Elena Moroz & Matt Sloan, "undated". "Evaluation of the Fruit Tree Productivity Project in Morocco: Design Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports a34b68aa86c4467ba08f09fa0, Mathematica Policy Research.

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