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Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men

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  • Robert H. Topel
  • Michael P. Ward

Abstract

Using longitudinal data, we study the processes of job mobility and wage growth among young men. During the first ten years in the labor market, a typical worker will hold seven jobs, about two thirds of his career total. The evolution of wages plays a key role in this transition to stable employment: wage gains at job changes account for at least a third of early-career wage growth, and the wage is the key determinant of job changing decisions among young workers. Job changing is a critical component of workers' movement toward the stable employment relations of mature careers.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1992. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 439-479.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:107:y:1992:i:2:p:439-479.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2118478
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