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Maintaining Momentum to 2015? An impact evaluation of interventions to improve maternal and child health and nutrition in Bangladesh

  • Howard White

    (Operations Evaluation Department, World Bank)

  • Edoardo Masset

    (Operations Evaluation Department, World Bank)

  • Nina Blondal

    (Operations Evaluation Department, World Bank)

  • Hugh Waddington

    (Operations Evaluation Department, World Bank)

Bangladesh has experienced rapid fertility decline and reductions in under-five mortality over the last three decades. This impact study unravels the various factors behind these changes. Economic growth has been important, but so have major public sector interventions, notably reproductive health and immunization, supported by external assistance from the World Bank and other agencies. By contrast, nutrition began to improve only in the 1990s and remains high. The Bangladesh Integrated Nutrition Program (BINP) has played a small role, if any, in this progress, which is mainly attributable to higher agricultural productivity.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/dev/papers/0510/0510004.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0510004.

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Length: 240 pages
Date of creation: 05 Oct 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0510004
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 240
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. M. M. Pitt & S. R. Khandker, 2002. "Credit Programmes for the Poor and Seasonality in Rural Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 1-24.
  2. Masset, Edoardo & White, Howard, 2003. "Infant and Child Mortality in Andhra Pradesh: Analysing changes over time and between states," MPRA Paper 11206, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Sen, Amartya, 1998. "Mortality as an Indicator of Economic Success and Failure," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(446), pages 1-25, January.
  4. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Adam Wagstaff & Naoko Watanabe, 2003. "What difference does the choice of SES make in health inequality measurement?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(10), pages 885-890.
  6. Sahn, David E. & Stifel, David C., 2000. "Poverty Comparisons Over Time and Across Countries in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2123-2155, December.
  7. World Bank, 2002. "Poverty in Bangladesh : Building on Progress," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15303, The World Bank.
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