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The Impact Of Health On Poverty: Evidence From The South African Integrated Family Survey

  • SUSAN GODLONTON
  • MALCOLM KESWELL

This paper examines the impact of health status on poverty status, accounting for the endogeneity of health status. Using exogenous measures of health status from the South African Integrated Health Survey, we instrument for health status while allowing for covariation among the unobservables influencing both health and household poverty status. Health status, as captured by the body mass index, is shown to strongly influence poverty status. Households that contain more unhealthy individuals are 60 per cent more likely to be income poor than households that contain fewer unhealthy individuals, and this finding appears invariant to the choice of poverty line. Copyright 2005 Economic Society of South Africa.

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File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1813-6982.2005.00010.x
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Article provided by Economic Society of South Africa in its journal South African Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 73 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (03)
Pages: 133-148

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Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:73:y:2005:i:1:p:133-148
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  1. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
  2. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G, 1995. "An Economic Analysis of Delayed Primary School Enrollment in a Low Income Country: The Role of Early Childhood Nutrition," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 156-69, February.
  3. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
  4. Julian MAY & Michael R. CARTER, 1997. "Poverty, Livelihood And Class In Rural South Africa," Staff Papers 408, University of Wisconsin Madison, AAE.
  5. Esther Duflo, 2000. "Child Health and Household Resources in South Africa: Evidence from the Old Age Pension Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 393-398, May.
  6. Manski, Charles F, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 531-42, July.
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