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Child Health and Household Resources in South Africa: Evidence from the Old Age Pension Program

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  • Esther Duflo

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Esther Duflo, 2000. "Child Health and Household Resources in South Africa: Evidence from the Old Age Pension Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 393-398, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:90:y:2000:i:2:p:393-398
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.90.2.393
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.90.2.393
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 766-817, June.
    2. Case, Anne & Deaton, Angus, 1998. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1330-1361, September.
    3. Frances Lund, 1993. "State social benefits in South Africa," International Social Security Review, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 46(1), pages 5-25, January.
    4. Servaas van der Berg, 2002. "Issues in South African Social Security," Working Papers 01/2002, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development

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