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Disability Cash Transfers in the Context of Poverty and Unemployment: the Case of South Africa

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  • Sophie Mitra

    (Fordham University, Department of Economics)

Abstract

South Africa's Disability Grant program has been widely criticized for its poor administration and the dependency culture it promotes. This paper attempts to assess the Disability Grant program's targeting effectiveness and its effects on labor market behaviors. Using disability self reports and standard measures of economic well being, results suggest that the Disability Grant is relatively well targeted. Exclusion and inclusion errors are substantial but are comparable to those found in developed countries' disability programs. Increased leniency in disability screening in the program in selected provinces does not appear to have altered labor market behaviors between 2001 and 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Sophie Mitra, 2009. "Disability Cash Transfers in the Context of Poverty and Unemployment: the Case of South Africa," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2009-08, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:frd:wpaper:dp2009-08
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sabina Alkire, 2011. "Multidimensional Poverty and its Discontents," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp046, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    2. Leibbrandt, Murray & Lilenstein, Kezia & Shenker, Callie & Woolard, Ingrid, 2013. "The influence of social transfers on labour supply: A South African and international review," SALDRU Working Papers 112, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    3. Deon Filmer & Louise Fox, 2014. "Youth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa
      [L’emploi des jeunes en Afrique subsaharienne - Rapport complet]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16608, November.
    4. George Mutasa, 2012. "Demographic, Community and Macroeconomic Effects on Disability Grant Programme Participation," Working Papers 12155, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    5. Palmer, Michael G. & Nguyen, Thi Minh Thuy, 2012. "Mainstreaming health insurance for people with disabilities," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 600-613.
    6. Akerkar, Supriya & Joshi, P.C. & Fordham, Maureen, 2016. "Cultures of Entitlement and Social Protection: Evidence from Flood Prone Bahraich, Uttar Pradesh, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 46-58.
    7. Kelly, Gabrielle, 2017. "Patient agency and contested notions of disability in social assistance applications in South Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 109-116.

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    Keywords

    Cash transfers; disability; targeting; labor supply; Africa; South Africa;

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