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Disability and the Rural Labor Market in India: Evidence for Males in Tamil Nadu

  • Mitra, Sophie
  • Sambamoorthi, Usha

Summary This paper examines the differences in employment and wages between males with and without disabilities, using data from the Village Disability Survey conducted in Tamil Nadu, India. We find that the employment gap between individuals with and without disability is not explained by differences in human capital and productivity, and may result from differential returns to characteristics and from discrimination in access to employment. Results from a selectivity-corrected wage equation suggest that wages are not statistically different between disabled and non-disabled males.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC6-4S1BT9Y-1/1/9e2e5adcfe208c52ef11435bd8b46436
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 934-952

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:5:p:934-952
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Melanie K. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2006. "Disability, gender, and the British labour market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 407-449, July.
  2. Marjorie Baldwin & William G. Johnson, 1994. "Labor Market Discrimination against Men with Disabilities," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(1), pages 1-19.
  3. Robert W. Fairlie, 2003. "An Extension of the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition Technique to Logit and Probit Models," Working Papers 873, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  4. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "The Absence of the African-American Owned Business: An Analysis of the Dynamics of Self-Employment," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt49c4n0fg, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  6. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  7. David Neumark, 1987. "Employers' discriminatory behavior and the estimation of wage discrimination," Special Studies Papers 227, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Malathy Duraisamy & P. Duraisamy, 1996. "Sex discrimination in Indian labor markets," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 41-61.
  9. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1990. "The Economic Well-Being of the Disabled: 1962-84," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(1), pages 32-54.
  10. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
  11. Becker, Gary S., 1971. "The Economics of Discrimination," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 2, number 9780226041162.
  12. Yeo, Rebecca & Moore, Karen, 2003. "Including Disabled People in Poverty Reduction Work: "Nothing About Us, Without Us"," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 571-590, March.
  13. Peter Skogman Thoursie, 2004. "Occupational Attainment and Earnings: The Case of the Disabled," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(3), pages 415-442, 09.
  14. Michael P. Kidd & Peter J. Sloane & Ivan Ferko, 1998. "Disability and the Labour Market: an analysis of British males," Working Papers 98-10, Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen.
  15. Johannes G. Hoogeveen, 2005. "Measuring Welfare for Small but Vulnerable Groups: Poverty and Disability in Uganda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 603-631, December.
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