IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/ilrrev/v52y1999i4p602-627.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Gender Earnings Differential in the Russian Transition Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Constantin G. Ogloblin

Abstract

Using data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS), the first nationally representative household survey in the Russian Federation, the author examines the gender earnings differential in Russia during the country's transition to a market economy. The gender wage ratio is calculated at 71.7%, and most of the difference is found to be attributable to occupational and industrial employment segregation by gender. The author argues that the lower pay in “female†industries and occupations is determined by the interaction of the institutional factors inherited from the Soviet past with the forces of the emerging market.

Suggested Citation

  • Constantin G. Ogloblin, 1999. "The Gender Earnings Differential in the Russian Transition Economy," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 602-627, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:52:y:1999:i:4:p:602-627
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ilr.sagepub.com/content/52/4/602.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Gender Earnings Differential in Russia After a Decade of Economic Transition," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(3).
    2. Linz, Susan J. & Semykina, Anastasia, 2008. "Attitudes and performance: An analysis of Russian workers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 694-717, April.
    3. Mal'tseva Inna, 2005. "Gender differences in occupational mobility and segregation at the labor market: The case of Russian economy," EERC Working Paper Series 05-11e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    4. Natalia V. Smirnova, 2003. "Re-employment Probabilities and Wage Offer Function for Russian Labor Market," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 547, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Andrén, Daniela & Andrén, Thomas, 2007. "Occupational Gender Composition and Wages in Romania: From Planned Equality to Market Inequality?," IZA Discussion Papers 3152, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Munich, Daniel & Svejnar, Jan & Terrell, Katherine, 2005. "Is women's human capital valued more by markets than by planners?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 278-299, June.
    7. Steven Stillman, 2000. "The Determinants of Private and Government Sector Earnings in Russia," Working Papers 00-17, RAND Corporation.
    8. Münich, Daniel & Svejnar, Jan & Terrell, Katherine, 2004. "Do Markets Favour Women's Human Capital More Than Planners?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Jurajda, Stepan, 2003. "Gender wage gap and segregation in enterprises and the public sector in late transition countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 199-222, June.
    10. Jolliffe, Dean & Campos, Nauro F., 2005. "Does market liberalisation reduce gender discrimination? Econometric evidence from Hungary, 1986-1998," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 1-22, February.
    11. Randall K. Filer & Jan Hanousek, 2002. "Data Watch: Research Data from Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 225-240, Winter.
    12. Cordula Zabel, 2008. "Patterns of partnership formation among lone mothers in Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-020, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Jurajda, Stepan & Harmgart, Heike, 2007. "When do female occupations pay more?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 170-187, March.
    14. Oglobin, C., 2005. "The Sectoral Distribution of Employment and Job Segregation by Gender in Russia," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(2).
    15. Jurajda, Stepán & Paligorova, Teodora, 2009. "Czech female managers and their wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 342-351, June.
    16. Constantin Ogloblin & Gregory Brock, 2006. "Wage Determination in Rural Russia: A Stochastic Frontier Model," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 315-326.
    17. Pastore Francesco & Verashchagina Alina, 2007. "The gender wage gap in the Republic of Belarus," EERC Working Paper Series 04-133e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    18. Ganguli, Ina & Terrell, Katherine, 2005. "Wage Ceilings and Floors: The Gender Gap in Ukraine's Transition," IZA Discussion Papers 1776, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:38-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Adamchik, A. & Bedi, A.S., 2001. "Persistence of the gender pay differential in a transition economy," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19091, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    21. Stephen Deloach & Annie Hoffman, 2002. "Russia's second shift: Is housework hurting women's wages?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(4), pages 422-432, December.
    22. Anna Lovasz, 2008. "Competition and the Gender Wage Gap: New Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data in Hungary 1986-2003," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 0804, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    23. Ben Yahmed, Sarra, 2016. "Formal but less equal: Gender wage gaps in formal and informal jobs in Brazil," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-085, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    24. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2016. "Looks matter: Attractiveness and employment in the former soviet union," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1604, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:52:y:1999:i:4:p:602-627. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: http://www.ilr.cornell.edu .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.