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Wage differentials between urban and rural-urban migrant workers in China

Author

Listed:
  • Zhang, Li
  • Sharpe, Rhonda Vonshay
  • Li, Shi
  • Darity, William A.

Abstract

Since the end of the 1980s, the number of migrants working in the urban labor market has increased dramatically. However, migrant workers are treated differently from urban workers. In this paper we examine the labor market discrimination against rural migrants from the point of view of wage differentials using CHIP-2007 data. We apply Jann pooled method to deal with index number problem and use Heckman two step model to correct selection problem when decomposing the wage gap. The decomposition results show that a significant difference in wage gains persists between the two groups as late as 2007. In 2007 migrants only earned 49% of urban workers' income and 17% of the wage gap cannot be explained by observed factors. In detail, differences in educational attainment, work experience and distribution across industry, occupation, and ownership of enterprises account for most of the explained wage gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Li & Sharpe, Rhonda Vonshay & Li, Shi & Darity, William A., 2016. "Wage differentials between urban and rural-urban migrant workers in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 222-233.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:41:y:2016:i:c:p:222-233
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2016.10.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dreger, Christian & Zhang, Yanqun, 2017. "The Hukou Impact on the Chinese Wage Structure," IZA Discussion Papers 10720, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1467-:d:145087 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:kap:iaecre:v:24:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11294-018-9688-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:139:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1719-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eee:chieco:v:53:y:2019:i:c:p:191-210 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:3:p:926-:d:205020 is not listed on IDEAS

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