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Pay and Job Rank Amongst Academic Economists in the UK: Is Gender Relevant?

Author

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  • Mumford, Karen A.

    (University of York)

  • Sechel, Cristina

    (University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This article presents and explores a rich new data source to analyse the determinants of pay and job rank amongst academic Economists in the UK. Characteristics associated with individual productivity and workplace features are found to be important determinants of the relative wage and promotion structure in this sector. However, there is also a substantial unexplained gender pay gap. Men are considerably more likely to work in higher paid job ranks where there are also substantial within-rank gender pay gaps. We show that the nature of the gender pay gap has changed over the last two decades; but its size has not, suggesting a role for suitable policy intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Mumford, Karen A. & Sechel, Cristina, 2019. "Pay and Job Rank Amongst Academic Economists in the UK: Is Gender Relevant?," IZA Discussion Papers 12397, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12397
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    Cited by:

    1. Gamage, Danula K. & Kavetsos, Georgios & Mallick, Sushanta & Sevilla, Almudena, 2020. "Pay Transparency Initiative and Gender Pay Gap: Evidence from Research-Intensive Universities in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 13635, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Sevilla, Almudena & Smith, Sarah, 2020. "Women in economics: A UK Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 15034, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. McManus, Richard & Mumford, Karen A. & Sechel, Cristina, 2021. "Measuring Research Excellence Amongst Economics Lecturers in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 14156, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Jones, Melanie K. & Kaya, Ezgi, 2021. "The Gender Pay Gap in UK Medicine," IZA Discussion Papers 14177, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    pay-gap; academia; economist; gender;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

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