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Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK

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  • Karen Mumford
  • Cristina Sechel

Abstract

We use new data to explore the determinants of pay, rank, and job satisfaction for academic economists in the UK. After allowing for a broad range of characteristics, including measures of individual productivity and workplace features, we find a raw (unconditional) gender salary difference of 15 log percentage points (lpp) and a conditional gender pay gap of 9 lpp. This aggregate pay gap is strongly influenced by the relative concentration of men in higher paid job ranks where there are also within-rank gender pay gaps. Nevertheless, the majority of academic economists (male and female) are satisfied with their job.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:17/17
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economics; gender; pay; satisfaction; gaps; academia.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

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