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Do Women Ask?

Author

Listed:
  • Artz, B.

    (University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh;)

  • Goodall, Amanda.H

    (Cass Business School, City University London and IZA Bonn)

  • Oswald, Andrew.J

    (CAGE Research Centre, University of Warwick, and IZA Bonn)

Abstract

Women typically earn less than men. The reasons are not fully understood. Previous studies argue that this may be because (i) women 'don't ask' and (ii) the reason they fail to ask is out of concern of the quality of their relationships at work. This account is difficult to assess with standard labor-economics data sets. Hence we examine direct survey evidence. Using matched employer-employee data from 2013-2014, the paper find that the women-don't-ask account is incorrect. Once an hours-of-work variable is included in 'asking' equations, hypotheses (i) and (ii) can be rejected. Women do ask. However, women do not get.

Suggested Citation

  • Artz, B. & Goodall, Amanda.H & Oswald, Andrew.J, 2016. "Do Women Ask?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1127, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:1127
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Do Women Ask?
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-09-28 23:31:48

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gamage, Danula K. & Kavetsos, Georgios & Mallick, Sushanta & Sevilla, Almudena, 2020. "Pay Transparency Initiative and Gender Pay Gap: Evidence from Research-Intensive Universities in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 13635, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Amanda Goodall & Margit Osterloh & Mandy Fong, 2020. "Women Shy Away From Competition – How To Overcome It," CREMA Working Paper Series 2020-21, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Martin Gonzalez-Rozada & Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2018. "Do women ask for lower salaries? The supply side of the gender pay gap," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018_02, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    5. Benjamin Artz & Amanda H. Goodall & Andrew J. Oswald, 2018. "Do Women Ask?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(4), pages 611-636, October.
    6. Martin Gonzalez-Rozada & Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2018. "Do women ask for lower salaries? The supply side of the gender pay gap," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018_02, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    7. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2020. "Pay and Job Rank among Academic Economists in the UK: Is Gender Relevant?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 58(1), pages 82-113, March.
    8. Jamin D. Speer, 2020. "Where the girls are: Examining and explaining the gender gap in the nursing major," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 67(3), pages 322-343, July.
    9. René Böheim & Sarah Gust, 2021. "The Austrian Pay Transparency Law and the Gender Wage Gap," CESifo Working Paper Series 8960, CESifo.
    10. Hengel, E., 2017. "Publishing while Female. Are women held to higher standards? Evidence from peer review," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1753, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Bredemeier, Christian, 2019. "Gender Gaps in Pay and Inter-Firm Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 12785, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. René Böheim & Marian Fink & Christine Zulehner, 2019. "About time: The narrowing gender wage gap in Austria," Economics working papers 2019-18, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    13. Alicia R. Ingersoll & Christy Glass & Alison Cook & Kari Joseph Olsen, 2019. "Power, Status and Expectations: How Narcissism Manifests Among Women CEOs," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 158(4), pages 893-907, September.
    14. Li, Cher H & Zafar, Basit, 2020. "Ask and You Shall Receive? Gender Differences in Regrades in College," IZA Discussion Papers 12983, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Böheim, René & Gust, Sarah, 2021. "The Austrian Pay Transparency Law and the Gender Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 14206, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. René Böheim & Sarah Gust, 2021. "The Austrian pay transparency law and the gender wage gap," Economics working papers 2021-05, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    17. Benjamin Artz & Sarinda Taengnoi, 2019. "The Gender Gap in Raise Magnitudes of Hourly and Salary Workers," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 84-105, March.
    18. Cher Hsuehhsiang Li & Basit Zafar, 2020. "Ask and You Shall Receive? Gender Differences in Regrades in College," NBER Working Papers 26703, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Leonora Risse, 2020. "Leaning in: Is higher confidence the key to women's career advancement?," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 23(1), pages 43-77.
    20. Khadija Straaten & Niccolò Pisani & Ans Kolk, 2020. "Unraveling the MNE wage premium," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 51(9), pages 1355-1390, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    matched employer-employee data; female discrimination; wages; gender;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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